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Pop Culture

Singing trio of cousins gets Dolly Parton's seal of approval for 'Jolene'-inspired song

A brilliant new take.

chapel hart AGT, chapel hart dolly parton

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Miss the bygone era of three-girl bands? Then meet Chapel Hart, a trio of country-singing cousins (two sisters and a first cousin) from Mississippi who recently appeared on “America’s Got Talent.” They not only wowed judges and earned a Golden Buzzer—they also caught the eyes of one of country music’s most beloved superstars.

The trio delighted audiences with “You Can Have Him, Jolene,” an original song inspired by their absolute favorite singer—and suggestion for the next president—Dolly Parton.

In this version, rather than pleading with Jolene to not steal the man away, Chapel Hart hilariously decides that, on second thoughts, “he don’t mean much to me," so Jolene can go ahead and take him. If that’s not the epitome of classic-with-a-twist, then I don’t know what is.

To add to their already glorious victory (with all judges plus host Terry Crews hitting the buzzer to take them onto the next round), Chapel Hart’s charming, infectious performance was seen by the Queen of Nashville herself.


Parton was so impressed that she tweeted, “What a fun new take on my song, @ChapelHartBand!,” and joked that her husband Carl Dean had his birthday today, ”so I think I'll hang on to him, and I'm not notifying Jolene that today is his birthday.”

As if an endorsement from Future President Parton weren’t great enough, Chapel Hart also received a song request from fellow country music icon Loretta Lynn. So many dreams to come true in one evening.

Moments before getting the Golden Buzzer, one of the singers shared that—despite their talent and passion—breaking into Nashville had been a challenge. “Country music doesn’t always look like us,” she said through tears. Howie Mandel assured them, “That is your win. You are going to be the original.”

The Mississippi trio said they were aiming for “world domination.” Looks like they’re well on their way.

via Tod Perry

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A passenger flying from Charlotte-Douglas International Airport in North Carolina to JFK International Airport in New York confronted that fear while flying with Delta. The woman, who is currently still unidentified expressed that she was nervous to fly according to Molly Simonson Lee, a passenger seated behind the woman who witnessed the encounter. Tight spaces don't make for much privacy, but in this case, the world is better for knowing this took place.

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via Wait But Why and used with permission

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