Cardi B tells 'Joey B' Biden what she wants from America's next president
via Elle

At a time when the entertainment world has been brought to a virtual standstill, rapper Cardi B is riding high. This week, her raunchy new single, "WAP" featuring Megan Thee Stallion, debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Cardi allegedly spent over $100,000 on the song's video for COVID-19 testing alone.

Cardi may have captured the world's attention by rapping about her "Wet A** Pu**y," but that's not the only topic on her mind. The rapper talked with Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on the eve of his party's convention.



At the beginning of the interview, Biden admitted that he and Cardi have something in common. "You know the nickname [his daughter] gave me when she was growing up? She called me Joey B. So we may be related," Biden joked.

Cardi shared her thoughts on COVID-19 and they're pretty much how we're all feeling these days.

CB: I have a whole list of things that I want our next president to do for us. But first, I just want Trump out. His mouth gets us in trouble so much. I don't want to be lied to—we're dealing with a pandemic right now, and I just want answers. I want to know when this will be over. I want to go back to my job. But I don't want someone to lie to me and tell me that it's okay not to wear a mask, that everything is going to be okay. I want a president to tell me what the steps are for us to get better, to tell me, "This is why it is taking so long, this is why other countries are doing better than ours." Tell me the truth, the hard-core truth.

Cardi B and Joey B also shared their thoughts on the Black Lives Matter movement.

CB: And you know, I feel like Black people, we're not asking for sympathy, we're not asking for charity—we are just asking for equality. We are asking for fairness, and we are asking for justice. That is all. I feel like everything people are asking for is getting interpreted in a very different way. No, it's simple: We just want justice. We want to feel like Americans.

JB: Well, I'll tell you what. I have a friend in Mississippi, Bennie Thompson, a very well-known congressman, an African American. He called me two weeks ago. He said, "Joe, I just came from a protest. There were as many white kids marching as Black kids. This is Mississippi, Joe. Things are changing." The reason I'm so optimistic is because of your generation. You're the smartest, the best educated, the least prejudiced, and the most engaged generation in history. And you're going to change things. I really mean it!

Joey B. also too the opportunity to discuss about his plan for free college, a big issue for people Cardi's age.

JB: Also, by the way, if I get elected president, anybody with a family [that makes] less than 125 grand, you're going to get free education. And everybody gets free community college.

CB: Do you think that's going to be able to happen?

JB: Absolutely, positively.

Cardi released a viral video two years ago where she vented about amount she pays in taxes. So, it's no surprise that she brought up the issue with the former vice president.

CB: But what a lot of people are concerned about is, if the government gives us [these things], are they going to raise our taxes? Because clearly nobody wants to pay so much in taxes. Sometimes, when my taxes come in, I'm like, "Oh my gosh, I'm depressed, oh Lord, let me see my Birkin collection." That is a little joke. [But] when you see the taxes coming off your check, you don't understand, because you feel like you're putting in so many hours. People want to know, can you provide college education, this [health care] plan, without a big chunk of taxes coming out of our checks?

JB: Yes, we can. And the way we can pay for all of this is doing practical things, like making sure that everybody has to pay their fair share. [For example] no corporation should pay less than 15 percent tax.

The interview ended with Joey B. pledging his honesty to his new friend Cardi, "I've never broken my word."

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.