Billie Eilish outsmarts body-shaming sexist trolls with her brilliant choice of clothing.

America's biggest female pop stars always have sex appeal. Whether it's their decision or their manager's, the most popular pop stars have always shown a bit of skin.

However, 17-year-old singer Billie Eilish, best known for her hit songs "Bad Guy" and "Bellyache," hasn't buckled to industry pressure to show off her body to sell records.

In a recent 30-second ad for Calvin Klein, the singer shares why she only wears baggy clothing.

“I never want the world to know everything about me," Eilish said in the ad. “I mean, that's why I wear big, baggy clothes. Nobody can have an opinion because they haven't seen what's underneath, you know?"


“Nobody can be like, 'Oh, she's slim-thick, she's not slim-thick, she's got a flat ass, she's got a fat ass. No one can say any of that, because they don't know."

Billie at Kroq's Almost Acoustic Christmas.

Photo by Kevin Winter / Getty Images

Billie at the 36th Annual ASCAP Pop Music Awards

Photo by Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

Billie on stage at Coachella performing with Khalid.

Photo by Kevin Winter / Getty Images

Billie's decision to keep her body under wraps is empowering, especially in a world where young girls are bombarded with touched-up images of women's bodies in magazines and on Instagram.

It's also a strong stance to take as an artist. She's not selling sex, she's selling her talent.

Photo by Taylor Wilcox on Unsplash

It's hard to believe that summer is almost over and the back-to-school season is right around the corner. The school year is approaching fast and since many kids have been home pandemic schooling for the past year and a half the return of "normal" is likely to bring kids and parents alike some anxiety about what the return to school will look like.

We have all been living through an extended trauma and this past year has impacted us in ways that we may not even realize—and we may not come to realize the scale in which we have been altered for years to come. Just as we have been learning to cope and navigate the world during a global pandemic, so have our children. They've been expected to perform at pre-pandemic levels for quite some time; this doesn't negate their very real reality of pandemic life.

Kids have had to readjust socially, and in many children this has caused a loss of social skills and increase in social anxiety. With school quickly approaching and the push for schools to open back to full capacity, it's completely normal to have heightened anxiety around the traditional opening of schools. How we handle this anxiety and prepare our children for their own challenges can make all the difference between having a rocky start to an already stressful new school year.


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