After a massively successful marketing stunt, 2 Chainz put the attention on a good cause.

Last month, rapper 2 Chainz decided to rent out a house in Atlanta, paint it a nice shade of Pepto-Bismol pink, scrawl the word "trap" across the front, and open it up to the public as a sort of ad hoc art installation — you know, just normal stuff, as one does.

The whole thing was a marketing gimmick to promote his latest album, "Pretty Girls Like Trap Music," and the project quickly took on a bit of a life of its own.


The pink trap house has been a runaway success, tagged nearly 300,000 times on Instagram in just a couple weeks. Then, 2 Chainz put that attention to good use.

On July 4, 2 Chainz teamed up with the Fulton County Board of Health, Atlanta AIDS, and Test Atlanta to offer free HIV testing to anyone who wanted to stop by the house.

Fulton County Board of Health say they pulling up today!! Come get tested and know your status! By the way this is Free99

A post shared by 2 Chainz Aka Tity Boi (@hairweavekiller) on

1 in 7 people living with HIV in the U.S. doesn't even know it. That's what makes the free HIV screening so important.

More than 1.1 million people in the U.S. are HIV-positive, and those who don't know their status, are most likely to spread the virus. While there's been a lot of progress in how we treat HIV/AIDS over the past several decades, it's still a serious issue that needs attention.

By stepping up and making it easy to get tested, 2 Chainz is fighting the stigma that comes with an HIV diagnosis and helping prevent future outbreaks.

Pretty cool, right?

Everyone should know their HIV status. Yes, everyone.

It's easy and free. You can check the Centers for Disease Control website to find a clinic near you.

In the meantime, 2 Chainz's Pink Trap House is open through July 7 (though there's a chance it'll be extended), so if you happen to be in the area, swing by, snap a few selfies, and let the world know you were there!

via Better to Be Different / Facebook

Natalie Fernando, 44, was walking down the seafront at Southend-on-Sea in Essex, England with her five-year-old son Rudy when he refused to turn around after she asked him. Rudy has autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and it's common for people with it to have difficulty being redirected, especially if they are enjoying an activity.

"My son loves to walk, but he hates to turn around and walk back, we usually try to walk in a circuit to avoid this but on his favourite walk with the boats we have no choice but to turn back," Natalie wrote on her blog's Facebook page, "Better to Be Different."

This caused Rudy to lay down on the ground and throw a tantrum. Natalie apologized to passersby for his loud noises, but she still received judgemental stares.

It's common for Rudy's tantrums to last for an hour or more and he can become very aggressive.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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