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Gulf Greyhound Park, the last greyhound racetrack in Texas, announced it will close by the end of 2015.

People and pups! It's time to break out your favorite celebration dance.


PARTY!!!

This is huge news. And not just because this one track is closing, but because this is part of a larger trend.

We all know that commercial greyhound racing is cruel on many levels. It's so horrible for the dogs that 39 U.S. states have flat-out banned it entirely. But we're not going to waste space making an argument against forcing dogs to run in circles for our amusement. Because it's time to celebrate:

Greyhound racing is officially a dying sport. Hooray!

Retired life is the good life. Photo by liz west/Flickr.

There are four states where dog racing is still legal, but all the tracks have closed down anyway.

You know what that means? It means people just aren't showing up to the races anymore. Some say gamblers have moved on to shinier things like casinos, the lottery, and online poker.

But it's nice to think that maybe we're all just fed up with people making money off of the mistreatment of animals.

He'll race, all right ... to his favorite spot on the couch. Photo by clarkmaxwell/Flickr.

Racing dogs just isn't profitable for venue owners anymore. Which means it's only a matter of time before it disappears completely.

They're even "fast" asleep. Get it?! Photo by hitthatswitch/Flickr.

And here's hoping it's soon: There are still seven states where greyhound racing is legal and active — a reality that the organization Grey2K USA is dedicated to putting an end to.

Florida is one of the few states left that has a greyhound racing scene, and it's home to over half of the country's race tracks. But state Sen. Garrett Richter recently admitted that it's only a matter of time before greyhound racing disappears from Florida, too.

With those venues gone, there'll be hardly anything left of this once enormously popular sport. I say, "Good riddance."

As for all those greyhounds who'll soon be out of jobs? We think they're better suited to cuddling with us on sofas.

You can find a greyhound rescue group near you using this website, and help give these retired dogs the loving home they deserve.

This article originally appeared on 09.06.17


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