A man tried to buy water rights so he could own the water he uses.

Most of America's produce comes from California. And food needs water to grow.

Via Giphy.

From strawberries, almonds, and avocados, to staples like lettuce and tomatoes, California is the source of what most of America eats every day. So, when you hear about the drought in California, it has implications that reach much further.


The drought in California is the worst in 1,200 years.

Via Giphy.

Just to make that fact feel a little more real, there hasn't been a worse drought since the year 815. The only people around in this country were Native Americans. And they weren't doing anything shady to the water, were they?

But, theoretically speaking, what if you wanted to buy some of your own water to prepare for the future of this drought?

Fact: A person or corporation can own the rights to water — and a lot of people in the western U.S. do. Then, they lease the water to farmers and/or the government. And then there are water brokers who go and buy water rights from landowners, which means that they can then lease out water that flows through other people's land.

Welcome to the "water market."

Weird, right? In the following podcast by "The Adaptors," Ryan Bradley dives into (pun!) this strange world through his journey of trying to buy $500 worth of water. Learn how some of the rules of water are based on how the West was won (frontiersman politics?) and some fascinating industry lingo like "waterlitics."

If the situation in California becomes so dire that the people who own that water have to choose between distributing it to farmers or to you, what's going to happen?

It would be one thing if people were just using too much water because then it could solved by restricting water use in affected areas. But it's not just that we're using too much, it's that some of the water we use isn't even owned by us OR the government. What will help is understanding this wild issue and pushing for more transparency.

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As part of its promise for a brighter world, Dole is partnering with Bye Bye Plastic Bags's efforts to bring sunshine to all.

Visit www.sunshineforall.com to learn more.

Who would have thought that giving the world access to all human knowledge via the internet, the ability to follow and hear from experts on any subject via social media, and the ability to see what's happening anywhere in the world via smartphones with cameras would result in a terrifying percentage of the population believing and spouting nothing but falsehoods day in and day out?

Those of us who value facts, reason, and rational thought have found ourselves at some of our fellow citizens and thinking, "Really? THIS is how you choose to use the greatest tool humanity has ever created? To spew unfounded conspiracy theories?"

It's a marvel, truly.

Between Coronavirus/Bill Gates/5G conspiracies and QAnon/Evil Cabal/Pedophile conspiracies, I thought we were pretty much full up on kooky for 2020. But apparently not. The massive fires up and down the West Coast have ignited even more conspiracy theories, some of which local law enforcement and even the FBI have had to debunk.

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

It sounds like a ridiculous, sensationalist headline, but it's real. In Cheshire County, New Hampshire, a transsexual, anarchist Satanist has won the GOP nomination for county sheriff. Aria DiMezzo, who refers to herself as a "She-Male" and whose campaign motto was "F*** the Police," ran as a Republican in the primary. Though she ran unopposed on the ballot, according to Fox News, she anticipated that she would lose to a write-in candidate. Instead, 4,211 voters filled in the bubble next to her name, making her the official Republican candidate for county sheriff.

DiMezzo is clear about why she ran—to show how "clueless the average voter is" and to prove that "the system is utterly and hopelessly broken"—stances that her win only serves to reinforce.

In a blog post published on Friday, DiMezzo explained how she had never tried to hide who she was and that anyone could have looked her up to see what she was about, in addition to pointing out that those who are angry with her have no one to blame but themselves:

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Dear JK Rowling,

I am writing this letter to say a big thank you to you. You may think it strange that a gobby trans woman such as me would wish to thank you after all your recent transphobic outpourings, but let me explain…

I certainly don't thank you for your lengthy essay last month where you describe the abuse you have suffered (for which you have my sympathy) and in which you stated that you do not hate trans people, while at the same time peddling even more anti-trans mis-information. Sadly, your diatribe directly caused some trans children to self-harm and other to attempt suicide.

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