The 5 most festive drive-thru holiday light shows for 2020
Hargis family spreads holiday cheer through annual light show

The pandemic has robbed us of the better part of a year. Not being able to have holiday celebrations has made it feel as if the holidays didn't even happen. Those little rituals of cutting turkey with your family on Thanksgiving or going to a BBQ on Labor Day are what makes the holiday feel more like a holiday than just getting the day off. Technically, the only reason why we had a Fourth of July this year is because July 4th is a date on the calendar.

COVID hasn't entirely cancelled Christmas. Festive Holiday light shows mean you can experience that Christmas-y feel from the safety of your own car. Or better yet, you can skip getting in your car and watch them on You Tube. These people have been working hard, despite the pandemic, to make sure that some of that Holiday magic enters our lives.


Magical Light Show

Titanium (David Guetta/Sia) 2020 Christmas Light Show www.youtube.com


The Magical Light Show happens every year in Tracy, California and 2020 isn't an exception. The light show also doubles as a fundraiser for the McHenry House, a family shelter in Tracy. You don't have to be anywhere near the California city to view the show or to donate. The organization is taking donations on their website.

The Grinch Who Stole Christmas Light Projection

The Grinch- Christmas House Projection Show 2020 www.youtube.com


COVID is basically the Grinch who stole Christmas, or at least the Grinch who reduced Christmas to only essential functions. This light show is the Dr. Seuss classic, but projected on to somebody's house – which is really the best way to see it, anyways.

Polar Christmas Light Show At Toronto Pearson Airport

Polar Christmas light Show 2020 Massive (4K) #Christmas Medley Disco Remix 2020 no copyright #Glow www.youtube.com


In any other year, going to the airport around the Holidays is a special kind of hell you'd only wish on your worst enemy (because it's not fatal, just uncomfortable). The upshot of 2020 is that Holiday travel is less painful, thanks in part to this fun light show on the way to the airport in Toronto. It's like a Christmas-y theme park ride at a time when theme parks are closed. And it's a lot cheaper than Disneyland, too.

Larsen's Light Show

Larsens Light Show - Carol of the Bells www.youtube.com


There's something so soothing and satisfying about watching perfectly synchronized lights and music. This Campton Hills, Illinois-based light show does not disappoint. The show is lovingly put on by Brian Larsen. This year is actually the last year for the show in its current location. Traffic issues are making the light show move to a different, larger, and hopefully less congested location.

COVID Mask (Monster Mash Parody)

Covid Mask - Monster Mash parody - Halloween lightshow 2020 www.youtube.com


Is it still October? It could be. Who really knows. Time has been irrelevant since March. It's hard to tell what day or month it is anymore. We didn't have Halloween, so this Monster Mash/face mask parody is still relevant, even though we're halfway through December. This cheeky light show pokes fun at the frustrations of having to wear a face mask. But seriously, you should wear a face mask. It's a pain in the butt, but it could save someone else's life.

When "bobcat" trended on Twitter this week, no one anticipated the unreal series of events they were about to witness. The bizarre bobcat encounter was captured on a security cam video and...well...you just have to see it. (Read the following description if you want to be prepared, or skip down to the video if you want to be surprised. I promise, it's a wild ride either way.)

In a North Carolina neighborhood that looks like a present-day Pleasantville, a man carries a cup of coffee and a plate of brownies out to his car. "Good mornin!" he calls cheerfully to a neighbor jogging by. As he sets his coffee cup on the hood of the car, he says, "I need to wash my car." Well, shucks. His wife enters the camera frame on the other side of the car.

So far, it's just about the most classic modern Americana scene imaginable. And then...

A horrifying "rrrrawwwww!" Blood-curdling screaming. Running. Panic. The man abandons the brownies, races to his wife's side of the car, then emerges with an animal in his hands. He holds the creature up like Rafiki holding up Simba, then yells in its face, "Oh my god! It's a bobcat! Oh my god!"

Then he hucks the bobcat across the yard with all his might.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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