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Johnson & Johnson - Donate a Photo

You take so many photos every day. Wouldn't it be great if the photos you take of the people, places and things you love could also do some good?

Believe it or not, humans take over one trillion photos every year. We document births and weddings, holidays and graduations, and so, so many selfies (don't worry about anything, you look amazing!). While just the act of taking photos can be a joy, your photos can do much more than document your best memories. In fact, sharing your photos can actually improve the health of people all around the world.

[rebelmouse-image 19346087 dam="1" original_size="750x500" caption="Photo by rawpixel/Unsplash" expand=1]Photo by rawpixel/Unsplash


Johnson & Johnson's Donate a Photo app allows you to do just that with your selfies, photos of dogs, food from that fancy restaurant you tried last week, or anything else you snap photos of.

All you need to do is download the app and share a photo, and Johnson & Johnson will donate one dollar per picture to causes you care about. What's more, when you share your donated photos on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, it creates a ripple effect. You’ll make others aware of the causes you care about, and maybe inspire them to join in, too.

Johnson & Johnson has carefully selected partner organizations that do everything from delivering vaccines  to children around the globe to helping young, underserved children preserve and improve their sight to connecting service members with their families while they're deployed.

The program has helped people like Lucy Cotto, an Operation Smile ambassador, who received a life-changing cleft palate correction surgery to heal her smile.

Lucy Cotto and a photo donated via Donate a Photo user. Photo via Johnson & Johnson

Since the program's inception, more than 200,000 people have shared nearly 4 million photos, which in turn have helped people all around the world get easier access to the essential treatments and services they need.

The app's success is based on one simple premise: that when lots of people work together to do good, those small acts add up to big change.

We all want to do good in our lives, and it always feels like we could be doing more, but time and (often) finances make that a difficult proposition. Donate a Photo makes it easy to give to a number of causes that are changing people's lives for the better.

Johnson & Johnson's longhistory of commitment to human health and bringing people together to make the world a better place makes it easy to trust that the photos you share will make an impact.

And that impact can be felt across a wide spectrum of health-related areas. Here are just a few of them.

Donate a Photo has raised enough money to help 2,304 children in need of cleft palate corrections. They've also made it possible for over 67,000 children around the world to receive much needed vaccines via donations to the Shot@Life.  And more than 55,000 infants were able to take their first breaths thanks to resuscitation devices from Save the Children.

What's more, Johnson & Johnson is making it possible for the healers of tomorrow to learn the valuable skills they'll need. Through the power of your photos, they've been able to help The National Student Nurses' Association provide 133 future nurses with scholarships that will help them achieve their goals in their chosen fields.  

Helen Pham — a FNSNA scholarship candidate and a photo donated via Donate a Photo user. Photo via Johnson & Johnson.

So the next time you take a photo, remember you could be saving so much more than an awesome memory.

Our photos connect us with our family and friends by capturing the good times. Now, those good times can help transform the world into a healthier place.

That place now has people like Helen Pham, who's getting her nursing degree thanks to Johnson & Johnson's partnership with the FNSNA, and babies who don't ever have to worry about taking their first breaths. And it wouldn't be possible without innovations that connect us all.

Whether you share a photo of your dog, your cat, your kid, or your favorite vacation spot, there's one thing you can remember: It only takes a second to make a difference. That power is in your hands.

Learn more about the Donate a Photo app in the video below:

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


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