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Pop Culture

Guy makes a tweet about what you should have 'by age 30.' People's responses were hilarious.

"By the age of 30 you should have anxiety, and an emotional support pet that also has anxiety."

this is 30, what to have by 30, turning 3o
Photo by NIPYATA! on Unsplash

This is 30.

When Steve Adcock, an entrepreneur and “fitness buff” posted this to his Twitter:

“By age 30, you should have a group of friends that talk business, money, and fitness, not politics and pop culture.”

… people had thoughts.



His post might have been intended as more of an encouragement to surround yourself with people who challenge your current mindset, considering the tweet continued with “one of the biggest mistakes I've ever made was making friends with like-minded folks who talked about the same [stuff] over and over. I agreed with 99% of it. Your comfort zone will kill your progress.”

But still, overall the tweet left an unsavory taste in people’s mouths—primarily because it implied that money was somehow a better conversation topic than what people are usually genuinely passionate about. Why not talk about your favorite television show with friends if it lights you up inside?



It also seemed to uphold the dying myth that by the age of 30, the puzzle pieces of adulthood should somehow, as if by magic, simply fall into place. And this is where folks chimed in with their own hilarious (and sarcastic) jokes about what one should expect by their third decade on planet Earth. They did not disappoint.

Here are 12 things you didn’t know you needed by the time you turn 30. Enjoy:

1.

By the age of 30 you should have anxiety, and an emotional support pet that also has anxiety.” – @shilparathnam

I have at least three friends who tick this box.

2.

turning 30

So. Many. 401ks.

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By the age of 30 you should have a therapist you always reschedule on, a big bag of spinach in the fridge that always goes bad before you get to it, and at least one stagnant 401k that you haven’t merged after changing jobs.” – @kianatipton

Check, check and check.

3.

By the age of 30 you should own, not rent, OWN a bouncy castle. This is a time when you should be building equity. The only way to beat inflation is with inflatables.” – @FridayinHalifax

Where’s the lie?

4.

viral twitter

What's one more notebook?

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By the age of 30 you should have a favorite pen you won’t let anyone use, a cache of pretty notebooks you’re saving for a special occasion, and at least one piece of media you rewatch endlessly for comfort.” – @allieiswriting


Oh how I do love using my unicorn gel pen while writing in my notebook as “The Great British Bake Off” plays in the background. Not my good notebook, of course. That’s tucked away for the day I finally write the next great American novel.

5.

“By the age of 30 you should have at least one large emotional support box of obsolete* cables.* but you know they aren't.” – @nanoraptor

Better yet, make it two.

6.

funny tweets

Iconic

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By age 30 you should have a sick ass jacket people identify you by.” – @dieworkwear


Nicolas Cage knew this back in the '90s.

7.

“By the age of 30 you should have at least 3-5 feral raccoons as your best friends.” – @casinthemeadow

A Marvel-based Twitter account thought something similar…

8.

millennials, millennial culture

Wink :)

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“By the age of 30, your friend group should consist of a talking raccoon, a tree with a limited vocabulary, the most dangerous woman in the galaxy, and Drax.” – @MarvelUnlimited

9.

By the age of 30 you should have one friend who is a little frog.” – @Hana_D_Barrett

I don’t know who these 30-year-olds with frog friends are, but they are winning at adulting.

10.

getting older memes

Don't forget a funny sidekick!

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By age 30 you should have several henchmen, a sworn enemy, and a narrative foil.” – SparkNotes

The company that’s helped us fake our way through book reports in high school offers life lessons too.

11.

millennial humor

My brain at all times.

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By the age of 30, you should have at least 5 web browsers with over 100 tabs opened that you don't have any plan to actually read.” – @KhoaVuUmn

Being 30 means having virtual commitment issues. Finally, one person rallied in the war of art versus commerce, and their stance was quite clear.

12.

“By your 40's-50's (or sooner), you realize that people that talk frequently about their money/wealth are nothing but insufferable, shallow boors. Call me dull, but I prefer to talk about amazing books, podcasts, gardening, hobbies, documentaries/shows on Netflix, etc.” – @SJCanyonLove

Bottom line: Love what you love and don't weigh yourself down with arbitrary rules about age.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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True

You could say Marine biologist, divemaster and National Geographic Explorer Dr. Erika Woolsey is a bit of a coral reef whisperer, one who brings her passion for ocean science to folks on dry land in a fresh, innovative and fun new way using virtual reality.

Images courtesy of Meta’s Community Voices film series

Her non-profit, The Hydrous, combines science, design, and technology to provide one-of-a-kind experiential education about marine life. In 2018, Hydrous produced “Immerse 360”, a virtual underwater journey through the coral reefs of Palau, with Dr. Woolsey as a guide.

Viewers got to swim with sharks, manta rays and sea turtles while exploring gorgeous aquatic landscapes and learning about the crucial role our oceans play—all from 360° and 3D footage captured by VRTUL 2 underwater storytelling VR cameras.


Hydrous then expanded on the idea to develop two more exciting augmented adventures using Meta Quest 2 technology: “Expedition Palau,” a live event where audiences can share a “synchronized immersive reality experience”, which includes live narration from Woolsey, and “Explore,” a “CGI experience” to enjoy the magic of the ocean at home.


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“I’ve been extremely fortunate to explore and study coral reefs around the world,” Woolsey said, sharing that it was “heartbreaking” to see these important habitats decay so rapidly while the latest scientific reports did not clearly lead to widespread compassionate action.

“How do we care about something we never see or experience?” she reflected. As she discovered, virtual reality would be a powerful solution for eliciting empathy. “VR has the ability to generate presence and agency and make you feel like you’re there. It's that emotional connection that can bridge scientific discovery and public understanding”

The combination of virtual reality and the ocean’s natural breathtaking beauty is, as Woolsey puts it, a “match made in heaven” for getting people more engaged in ocean education. “When you’re floating you can look up and down and all around you…seeing a school of fish surrounding you and reefs in these cathedral-like structures. Rather than watching a video of a scientist, you get to become the scientist.”

Hydrous also has special kits to provide middle school students hands-on learning about ocean life. In addition to a journal, activity cards and a smartphone VR viewer, each kit includes lifelike 3D printed model pieces of a coral reef so that middle school students can try building their own.

These reef models even turn white when temperatures rise inside the aquarium, which mimics the real “bleaching” that corals endure when they die due to higher than normal ocean temperatures. Students really do become scientists as they figure out how to bring color back to their reef.

While it’s true that the health of our oceans affects us all, the growing threats our oceans face—pollution, overfishing, climate change—don’t always affect us on an empathetic level. Through the use of technology, Woolsey has created an innovative way to connect hearts and minds to one of the Earth’s most important resources, which can inspire real and lasting change.

“We can’t bring everybody to the ocean, but we’re finding scalable ways to bring the ocean to everyone.”

To learn more about Hydrous, click here.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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