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'Wally' the wandering walrus won't stop stealing people's boats. So now he's getting his own.

Imagine you're out enjoying a nice float on a boat nowhere near the Arctic, when you spot a ginormous Arctic walrus hoisting himself out of the water and onto a boat nearby.

What do you do, besides pull out your camera and take a video?

That's Wally the walrus, as he's come to be known, and that boat is somewhere along the coast of the British Isles. The juvenile Arctic walrus was first spotted in March and has been seen along the coast of Western Europe as far south as Spain, according to the BBC, but appears to be making his way back north, hopefully to his home habitat. He's doing alright, but there's one problem: He's been making himself at home on people's boats along the way and, unsurprisingly considering his size, sinking some of them.


Walruses live much of their life swimming around in the water, but they need surfaces to rest on. Up in the Arctic, they'll lounge on floating pieces of ice, but down in the sea waters surrounding the British Isles, Wally keeps trying to park his massive self on sea vessels that don't belong to him.

According to the Irish Examiner, British Divers Marine Life Rescue (BDMLR) in the UK provided a floating pontoon for Wally during the six weeks he spent in the Isles of Scilly this summer. Now that he's hanging off the coast of Ireland, Seal Rescue Ireland (SRI) has secured an unused pontoon for Wally's use and scented it using towels from a boat that he'd recently utilized (and sunk).

SRI is working with other wildlife groups to try to help keep Wally safe as he makes his way back to wherever he came from.

"We have never done this before so there are lots of learnings as we go," SRI executive director Melanie Croce told the Irish Examiner.

"We would like to be able to let him to continue his natural behaviors but when word gets out about his location, a situation arises where we have to intervene.

"We only step in when human interactions with him threaten to disturb him. Our priority is the animal's welfare."

Boaters are asked to stay 100-500m away from Wally and not to publicly announce sighting locations until the designated floating vessel can be deployed for him.

Wally the walrus climbs on our boat in the isles of scillywww.youtube.com

Too many people congregating to see him could interfere with Wally's ability to go where he needs to go in addition to causing him unnecessary distress.

Wally has wandered thousands of miles and still has a long way to go if he's going to make it home. Poor Wally doesn't mean to be a nuisance—he just gets tuckered out and needs somewhere to lay his weary head.

Good for the wildlife protectors for figuring out a way to give the big guy a resting spot and for advising everyone to let Wally find his way without human interference.

Wally the Walrus tour of Europe continues (8) (Isles of Scilly) - ITV News - 6th July 2021www.youtube.com

Good luck, Wally. Hope you find your way home soon.

Hold on, Frankie! Mama's coming!

How do you explain motherhood in a nutshell? Thanks to Cait Oakley, who stopped a preying bald eagle from capturing her pet goose as she breastfed her daughter, we have it summed up in one gloriously hilarious TikTok.

The now viral video shows the family’s pet goose, Frankie, frantically squawking as it gets dragged off the porch by a bald eagle—likely another mom taking care of her own kiddos.

Wearing nothing but her husband’s boxers while holding on to her newborn, Willow, Oakley dashes out of the house and successfully comes to Frankie's rescue while yelling “hey, hey hey!”

The video’s caption revealed that the Oakleys had already lost three chickens due to hungry birds of prey, so nothing was going to stop “Mama bear” from protecting “sweet Frankie.” Not even a breastfeeding session.

Oakley told TODAY Parents, “It was just a split second reaction ...There was nowhere to put Willow down at that point.” Sometimes being a mom means feeding your child and saving your pet all at the same time.

As for how she feels about running around topless in her underwear on camera, Oakley declared, “I could have been naked and I’m like, ‘whatever, I’m feeding my baby.’”

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