His First Day On The Job Was Also His Last. The Tragic Story Of Day Davis.

Day Davis was 90 minutes into the first day of his first job at the Bacardi bottling plant in Jacksonville, Fla. What happened to him is tragic. But beyond that, his story is a wake-up call about the dangers of one of the fastest-growing and most lightly regulated sectors of the U.S. economy: blue-collar temp work.

In March 2014, there were a record 2.8 million temp workers in the U.S. And, as the chart below shows, a big chunk of that growth is from blue-collar jobs. In fact, since the Great Recession, the temp work sector is growing at 9 times the rate of private sector employment.

And here's where the U.S. stands compared to other countries in the OECD in terms of protections for temporary workers. These rankings are based on answer to questions like: Can you pay temporary workers less than full-time employees? How long can you employ a temporary employee before they become, well, not temporary?

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A 40-Year-Old Ad For Temps That's As Sexist As It Is Wildly Revealing About Today

This ad was put out by Kelly Services, a temporary staffing agency, in 1971.

Let's, for a moment, bypass the creepy, "Mad Men"-esque vibes here and focus on some of the words. The basic proposition here is that temp workers are better than full-time staffers because a) they're cheaper and b) they're completely expendable.

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Natasha Rossi believed she had the perfect life.

She had two awesome kids — two and a half-year-old identical twins — and the love and support of her boyfriend, Desi. Life, she thought, could only get better.

All photos via Upworthy/Walgreens.

Then, in January 2019, she was hit with some of the hardest news that anyone can hear.

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While Congress is hard at work setting the galactic record for sustained inaction, President Obama is flubbing a huge opportunity to fix one of America's longest-churning crises.

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