His First Day On The Job Was Also His Last. The Tragic Story Of Day Davis.

Day Davis was 90 minutes into the first day of his first job at the Bacardi bottling plant in Jacksonville, Fla. What happened to him is tragic. But beyond that, his story is a wake-up call about the dangers of one of the fastest-growing and most lightly regulated sectors of the U.S. economy: blue-collar temp work.

In March 2014, there were a record 2.8 million temp workers in the U.S. And, as the chart below shows, a big chunk of that growth is from blue-collar jobs. In fact, since the Great Recession, the temp work sector is growing at 9 times the rate of private sector employment.

And here's where the U.S. stands compared to other countries in the OECD in terms of protections for temporary workers. These rankings are based on answer to questions like: Can you pay temporary workers less than full-time employees? How long can you employ a temporary employee before they become, well, not temporary?

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A 40-Year-Old Ad For Temps That's As Sexist As It Is Wildly Revealing About Today

This ad was put out by Kelly Services, a temporary staffing agency, in 1971.

Let's, for a moment, bypass the creepy, "Mad Men"-esque vibes here and focus on some of the words. The basic proposition here is that temp workers are better than full-time staffers because a) they're cheaper and b) they're completely expendable.

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We All Love To Get Our Packages In A Hurry. Here's The Dirty Secret Behind How They Do That.

Listen, I really don't want to be that guy. I, too, love receiving my packages promptly and am no stranger to the giddy sensation of seeing that cardboard box waiting for me at my doorstep.But everything has its costs, and to make this modern luxury a reality, companies like Amazon, Walmart, and others are creating an entire sector of low-paid, under-protected temporary workers who are routinely boxing and shipping items they couldn't afford to buy. Here's an inside look at how it's changing the American economy and degrading working conditions for everyone.

Two very powerful women get asked about double standards. Their responses probably won't shock you.

On stage at the Women in the World Conference, International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde and former U.S. Senator and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton were asked about double standards in media coverage of women in politics. You can almost feel them restraining heavy eye rolls before delivering a couple of great stories about persisting stereotypes of women in politics and society.