+
upworthy
Internet

TikTok sets time limit of 60 minutes for teens. The move could create mindful social media use.

Teens will have to enter a passcode to extend their time.

TikTok; TikTok time limit; social media; teen mental health; mental health
Photo by Solen Feyissa on Unsplash

TikTok sets time limit of 60 minutes for teens.

TikTok has been on the minds of teens and adults alike over the past few years. During the pandemic, the video social media app helped bored teens and adults pass the time learning viral dances or doing internet challenges. But recently, it has come under more scrutiny for security concerns as well as mental health concerns for its teen users.

Social media and the significant role it plays in the decline of adolescent mental health has been a prime discussion as study after study raises concern. Teens don't just face cyberbullying via social media apps, they're also susceptible to body image issues and feelings of low self-esteem based off of the images they see online.

It seems that TikTok has taken note of the concerns and is attempting to help teens set healthier boundaries around the use of the app. The social media giant announced that they would be setting a default time limit of one hour for app users under the age of 18. After the hour is up, teen users will have to make a conscious choice whether they want to keep scrolling by typing in a passcode. This obviously won't solve all of the problems, but the tech company could be on to something.



Teenagers are generally more impulsive due to the way human brains develop. Our frontal lobes aren't fully developed until we reach our mid to late 20s and since this is the part of the brain that controls impulses, it's not a surprise teens are more likely to impulsively scroll. The reward factor is also high with fast-paced apps like TikTok. With each new video, dopamine is released in your brain, and if you couple that feel-good chemical reaction with low impulse control, you've got a recipe for endless engagement—unless it's interrupted.

TikTok's new feature will act as an interrupter for teens. sort of like when a person is daydreaming and someone snaps their fingers to break through to the daydreamer. The 60-minute notification will act as a virtual finger snap, giving teens a second to decide if it's time to put down the phone.

The company also goes a step further for users under 13. In a press release, TikTok says that younger teens will still have the automatic hour time limit, but when their time is up, the parent/guardian will have to enter the passcode. This will only permit an additional 30 minutes of scroll time.

TikTok; TikTok time limit; social media; teen mental health; mental health

TikTok time limit screen

TikTok press release

The time limits aren't arbitrarily chosen by the social media powers that be. "While there's no collectively-endorsed position on the 'right' amount of screen time or even the impact of screen time more broadly, we consulted the current academic research and experts from the Digital Wellness Lab at Boston Children's Hospital in choosing this limit," Cormac Keenan, Head of Trust and Safety said.

This move isn't going to stop teens from overindulging in social media, but it's something, and it shows that these big tech giants are at least taking note of the potential impacts on young users.

Pop Culture

Optical illusion that looks like a person with two dogs has people totally tripping

It takes a while to see it, but there are not two dogs in the photo.

Where is the third dog in this photo?

Optical illusions are wild. The way our brains perceive what our eyes see can be way off base, even when we're sure about what we're seeing.

Plenty of famous optical illusions have been created purposefully, from the Ames window that appears to be moving back and forth when it's actually rotating 360 degrees to the spiral image that makes Van Gogh's "Starry Night" look like it's moving.

But sometimes optical illusions happen by accident. Those ones are even more fun because we know they aren't a result of someone trying to trick our brains. Our brains do the tricking all by themselves.

Keep ReadingShow less
Joy

Slow motion video of jumping baby goats is a great life lesson in disguise

A video we didn't even know we needed…but totally do!

Sunflower Farm Creamery/Youtube

This is almost too cute for words.

Look, you’re busy. You’ve got stuff that needs to be done today. Do you really have time to watch tiny baby goats jump in slow motion? Will that really add anything of value to your life?

Actually, the answer is yes. Because watching tiny baby goats jump in slow motion is not only exceedingly entertaining, it’s actually a simple life lesson in disguise.

These little guys hail from Sunflower Farm Creamery in Maine, where 60 (yes, 60) goats are born each year. Sunflower Farm promises that even if you didn’t love goats before, you will after watching videos from its Youtube channel showing the wee babes run, play, hop and snuggle. I mean, there’s another video showing the goats in pajamas…what’s not to love?
Keep ReadingShow less
@susandoingsusanthings/TikTok

Though this image might infuriate you, know there's more to the story.

We’ve probably all (especially moms and wives) have had it up to here with stories of men not being able to really pull their weight in partnerships.

So when I present to you a story about a husband leaving behind a sink full of dirty dishes for his wife to find, you’d probably sooner roll your eyes and contemplate hopping over to Instagram instead than give this one a read.

But hold on just a second, because this story has a surprising hopeful twist.

Keep ReadingShow less
Pop Culture

Compilation of Mr. Rogers' lesser-known shining moments is a masterclass in human kindness

Take 10 minutes to let Fred Rogers' wholesome goodness wash over you (but maybe grab a tissue first).

Fred Rogers was an example for us all.

History has many heroes, but few human beings have left a direct mark on children's lives like Fred Rogers did. In a time when television had become a staple in American households, prompting fears over its potentially pernicious influence, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood shone like a beacon of wholesome delight.

Fred Rogers' conviction that educational television could make a positive difference in the lives of children has been proven true again and again. Countless people have shared how Mr. Rogers' messages of love and compassion and self-worth influenced them during their formative years, and for many, his presence provided a calm and stability that were missing in their own households.

The emotional and societal topics Mr. Rogers tackled are vast and varied, and it seems there are always more gems of goodness to uncover in the archives. Eric Stanley of "Stay Inspired" shared a compilation of clips from Fred Rogers' life that exemplify his warm, genuine kindness, some of which are unfamiliar even to ardent fans of the show.

Keep ReadingShow less
Canva

Mom makes teen son's bed and picks up his clothes after he goes to school.

Parenting is difficult, not only because raising unique human beings through childhood and beyond is complex on every level, but because it's hard to know if you're doing it right. And the internet definitely doesn't help on that front, as everyone has an opinion on what constitutes good parenting.

Case in point: A mom who makes her teen son's bed and picks up his clothes for him after she drops him off at school every morning.

Shannon Tarkey a mother of five (including triplets), shared a video on Instagram and Facebook showing how she makes her son's bed and picks up his clothes, and people had feelings about it. The text overlay on the video as she's tidying up reads:

Keep ReadingShow less

The bride wouldn't budge.

One of the major decisions a couple has when planning a wedding is whether guests are free to bring their children or if it will be child-free. Many people believe that children should be able to come to weddings because, after all, they are family affairs.

However, the counter-argument is that a wedding also costs a lot of money per guest, and people would rather have an adult enjoying a $75 plate of prime rib than a 5-year-old who will take a bite and then ask for some chicken nuggets.

Further, the child-free crowd may also want their party to be an all-out rave, which may be inappropriate for children to attend.

Keep ReadingShow less