This restaurant proves restaurants can feed the homeless and still stay in business.
True
Truvia

Kazi Mannan may have grown up in Pakistan in poverty, but that didn't mean his family wasn't doing everything they could to help those in need.

"My mother taught us if we have a little bit extra, we must share and care for others," he explains.

Mannan's family back in Pakistan. Photo courtesy of Mannan.


That lesson stayed with him long after he grew up and moved to Washington D.C. He managed to land a job at a gas station in Northeast D.C., and while he was there, he couldn't help but notice how many homeless people were looking for food in trash cans. As someone who's personally familiar with the struggles of poverty, he felt for them deeply, and knew he must find a way to help.

"I said: 'one day, if I ever have a restaurant, you know what I’m going to do? I’m going to open the door for them.'"

So that's exactly what Mannan did. Once he'd made enough money, he bought a small restaurant at the corner of 11th and K Street NW, just blocks away from the White House. It was decades old and needed work, but to someone who grew up without plumbing or electricity, the endeavor wasn't so daunting.

On the same day he opened his to the public in 2013, Mannan also invited all the homeless people he could find to have a meal there for free. While they were somewhat dubious of his offer at first, when he kept his word and invited them to come back whenever they needed a meal, they embraced his kindness.

Mannan with a homeless man he serves. Photo via Upworthy.

“They’re the nicest people in town," says one homeless man who frequents the restaurant. "They feed us for free and take care of us.”

While it may not sound like a sustainable idea, the restaurant is still open five years later. Last year, they served 16,000 free meals on top of the meals they serve to paying customers.

And they don't just cater to homeless people in the restaurant. If business is slow, they set up a cart out in the park, and invite them to come and eat out there as well.

Mannan's also upping the altruistic ante in other ways, too: He has a goal of increasing the number of free meals they serve to those in need by 6,000 every year from here on out.

"This is my home, and I feel that I should participate in the community," explains Mannan. "Sharing your food with others is a joy."

Photo via Upworthy.

He's not the only one working at the restaurant who feels that way. His brother is helping out as chef, and his oldest son serves there when he's home from college for the holidays. Needless to say, this proclivity for extending a hand to the community is a family trait.

It all comes back to Mannan's mother, who would always provide food and shelter for people in need, even when the family themselves had very little.

When you treat strangers like family, they become family in a way. That idea fuels Mannan everyday to keep his restaurant going.

Learn more about Mannan's story below:

"We must share and care for others"

This immigrant-owned restaurant in DC always has its doors open for those in need.

Posted by Upworthy on Friday, October 5, 2018
True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
via Brittany Kinley / Facebook

Brittany Kinley, a mother from Mansfield, Texas, had a hilarious mom fail her and she's chalking it up to being just another crazy thing that happened in 2020.

When Kinley filled out the order form for her son Mason's kindergarten class pictures, there was an option to have his name engraved into the photos. But Kinley wasn't interested in having her son's name on the photos so she wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" on the box.

Well, it appears as though she should have left the box blank because the computer or incredibly literal human that designed the photographs wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" where mason's name should be.

Keep Reading Show less
True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.

Somewhere in Salt Lake City, a Girl Scout is getting allll the good mojo from The People of the Internet.

Over the weekend, Eli McCann shared a story of an encounter at a Girl Scout cookie stand that has people throwing their fists in the air and shouting, YES! THAT'S HOW IT'S DONE. (Or maybe that's just me. But I'm guessing most of the 430,000 people who liked his story had a similar reaction.)

Keep Reading Show less
via UDOT / Facebook

In December 2018, The Utah Department of Transportation opened the largest wildlife overpass in the state, spanning 320 by 50 feet across all six lanes of Interstate 80.

Its construction was intended to make traveling through the I-80 corridor in Summit County safer for motorists and the local wildlife.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that there were over 100 animal incidents on the interstate since 2016, giving the stretch of highway the unfortunate nickname of "Slaughter Row."

Keep Reading Show less