This is how the newest Broadway musical, 'Waitress,' is making history.

Broadway’s newest musical, "Waitress," is already poised for success.

It’s an adaption of the beloved 2007 indie film starring curly-haired genius Keri Russell. In the film, Russell plays Jenna, a small-town — you guessed it — waitress who’s unhappy with her marriage and her lackluster life in general.

She does have one creative outlet, though: pie-making. (For example, “I-hate-my-husband pie.” Mmmm, resentment.)


Tony-winner Jessie Mueller, left, will star in the Broadway version of the film. Here, she hangs out with the composer of the show, Sara Bareilles. Image via video interview with cast and crew by Broadway.com/YouTube.

The Broadway show is also busting barriers: It boasts an all-female core creative team for the first time.

“Whaaaaat?” You may be thinking. Yes, it’s true: Having four women lead a Broadway musical in roles of writer, scorer, choreographer, and director hasn't happened before. I know, I know. But the day has finally come, and our feminist goals are being met left and right. Hillary! Beyoncé! Those funny tampon ads!

GIF from "The 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards."

Traditionally, a musical’s core creative team consists of four key roles.

Those roles are writer, director, choreographer, and composer. And in "Waitress," these roles have all been filled by women. Who are these crazy-talented people? Count ‘em up, chief.

First up is Lorin Latarro, a powerhouse choreographer with past credits like "American Idiot" on Broadway and the delightful "This American Life" musical with Lin-Manuel Miranda.

Hey, Lorin! Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images.

Then there’s Tony-nominated director Diane Paulus, bringing her skills to the staging of the musical.

Photo by Ben Gabbe/Getty Images for Time.

Jessie Nelson took on writing the whip-smart, darkly funny musical. And as for the composer role, singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles crafted a collection of new songs just for the production.

“I’m thrilled that 'Waitress' is breaking boundaries as the first Broadway musical with book, score, choreography and direction by a team of women,” Paulus said in a recent press release.

“It’s a historic and long overdue moment for Broadway, and I’m honored to be working alongside such passionate and inspiring women.”

Here’s to more women behind the scenes. More women in the scenes. More women everywhere!

The call for more substantial female roles on stage and on screen has been well documented, as it should be. But the fight for power behind the scenes gets less attention. That’s why it's exciting to see a squad like this one coming together to call the shots for a big-deal Broadway musical. It’s certainly cause for a dance party.

The pie-tastic production opens in April 2016. Anybody hungry?

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
True

This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

Keep Reading Show less

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

Keep Reading Show less