+

On Queen Elizabeth's 92nd birthday, some pretty awesome history happened in the United Kingdom.

With style, swagger, and an incredibly dapper look, Indian-born British guardsman Charanpreet Singh Lall became the first soldier to don a turban during the Trooping the Colour parade.

Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images.


Trooping the Colour is a celebration that has commemorated sovereign birthdays for more than 250 years. It also functions as a display of military drills, music, and horsemanship. Marching alongside his colleagues who were wearing their well-known bearskin hats (ceremonial military caps that date back to the 17th century) Lall proudly wore one of the most visible representations of his religion while showing his pride for his country.

"Being the first turban-wearing Sikh to troop the colour and to be part of the escort it is a really high honour for myself, and hopefully for everyone else as well," Lall told BBC.

Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images.

Originally from Punjab, India, Lall's family moved to the U.K. when he was just a baby. Living in Leicester for most of his life, the 22-year-old joined the British army in 2016, and has worked to bring representation and important changes to one of the country's most traditional industries.

By highlighting his religion, Lall is not only making history, he's making representation matter in the U.K.

"I hope that more people like me, not just Sikhs but from other religions and different backgrounds, that they will be encouraged to join the Army," Lall said.

Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images.

Known for its commitment to traditionalism and European heritage, Britain isn't exactly expected to budge on certain traditions. But people like Lall are changing that. As the country welcomes one of its first black duchesses, Lall joins a changing British landscape that prominently shows people of all ethnicities, genders, and religions in important, respected roles. It's a remarkable, long overdue change that can create space for other British citizens who want to do good things in their country, while also respecting their culture and beliefs.

Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images.

"I hope that people watching ... will just acknowledge it and that they will look at it as a new change in history," he said. "I'm quite proud and I know that a lot of other people are proud of me as well,"

People are definitely watching, and they're incredibly proud.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

Keep ReadingShow less

RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


Keep ReadingShow less