These clothes are comfy and stylish and can make life much easier for kids with autism.

Like every parent, Lauren Thierry wants her son to be independent.

That includes the ability for him to dress himself without getting frustrated.

"A lot of people with autism have issues with fine and gross motor skills," Lauren, whose son, Liam, has autism, explained to ABC News.


"I know it sounds like such a non-issue. And yet, if your kid can't get dressed, they can't get out of the house. You start to realize mom is not going to live forever."

Lauren and her son, Liam. Photo courtesy of Lauren Thierry.

That's why she created a clothing line designed specifically for kids with cognitive impairments and physical disabilities.

It's called Independence Day Clothing. And it's awesome.

Photo courtesy of Lauren Thierry.

They may just look like a stylish group of kids. But their clothes are unique in subtle and important ways.

Because of those issues Lauren mentioned above, some common features on clothing — things like buttons, zippers, tags, and lace — can make it difficult for children with autism to get dressed by themselves. So, you won't find any buttons, zippers, tags, or lace on Independence Day clothes.

Lookin' fly, guys! Photo courtesy of Lauren Thierry.

Essentially, there's "no way to wear it wrong," Lauren says.

The clothing line is filled with items made with super-sensory-smooth (aka very comfy) fabric and without a clear front or back so that kids can put them on whichever way they please.

Many items are also equipped with GPS devices.

Having a child wander off unsupervised can be a nightmare for any parent, but it can be especially troublesome if that child has autism. Independence Day Clothing includes tracking technology in several of its items, putting moms and dads at ease.

"Anytime I want to know where my child is, I whip out my iPhone — there's an app right there," Thierry told HuffPost Live in March 2015. "Four seconds later, I know exactly where [my son] is."

These clothes aren't just easy and stylish, they keep kids safer too. Photo courtesy of Lauren Thierry.

Lauren also has other cool items in the works, like sweaters, unisex shorts, and socks with no heel or toe seam.

Seriously, we want to see these designs rocking a red carpet soon. Photo courtesy of Lauren Thierry.

These clothes may be innovative. But to Lauren, her work comes down to simply wanting what's best for her kid.

While some may consider Independence Day Clothing "revolutionary" — as one media outlet proclaimed — she told Upworthy she sees it otherwise:

"What I did was not revolutionary. It was simply something that had to be done. Like the moms in the 1960s who safety pinned mittens to their kids coats before there were mitten clips. The moms did it because those 'kittens' might lose their 'mittens.' Revolutionary? No, just 'mom sense.'"

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Don Bay has been in the citrus business for over 50 years now, and according to him, his most recent growing endeavor has been the most challenging. Alongside his son Darren and grandson Luke, Don cultivates Sumo Citrus®, one of the most difficult fruits to grow. The Bay family runs San Joaquin Growers Ranch in Porterville, California, one of the farms where the fruit is grown in the United States.

Sumo Citrus was originally developed in Japan, and is an extraordinary hybrid of mandarin, pomelo and navel oranges.

The fruit is temperamental, and it can take time to get a thriving crop. The trees require year-round care, and it takes five years from seed to fruit until they're ready for harvest. Thanks to expert citrus growers like the Bay family though, Sumo Citrus have flourished in California. Don and his son Darren worked together through trial and error to perfect their crop of Sumo Citrus. Darren is now an expert on cultivating this famously temperamental fruit, and his son Luke is learning from him every step of the way.

Don, Darren and Luke BayAll photos courtesy of Sumo Citrus

"Luke's been involved as early as he could come out," Darren said in a YouTube video.

"Having both my son and grandson [working with me] is basically what I've dreamt about," said Don. "To have been able to develop this orchard and have them work on it and work with me — then I don't have to do all the work."

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