These clothes are comfy and stylish and can make life much easier for kids with autism.

Like every parent, Lauren Thierry wants her son to be independent.

That includes the ability for him to dress himself without getting frustrated.

"A lot of people with autism have issues with fine and gross motor skills," Lauren, whose son, Liam, has autism, explained to ABC News.


"I know it sounds like such a non-issue. And yet, if your kid can't get dressed, they can't get out of the house. You start to realize mom is not going to live forever."

Lauren and her son, Liam. Photo courtesy of Lauren Thierry.

That's why she created a clothing line designed specifically for kids with cognitive impairments and physical disabilities.

It's called Independence Day Clothing. And it's awesome.

Photo courtesy of Lauren Thierry.

They may just look like a stylish group of kids. But their clothes are unique in subtle and important ways.

Because of those issues Lauren mentioned above, some common features on clothing — things like buttons, zippers, tags, and lace — can make it difficult for children with autism to get dressed by themselves. So, you won't find any buttons, zippers, tags, or lace on Independence Day clothes.

Lookin' fly, guys! Photo courtesy of Lauren Thierry.

Essentially, there's "no way to wear it wrong," Lauren says.

The clothing line is filled with items made with super-sensory-smooth (aka very comfy) fabric and without a clear front or back so that kids can put them on whichever way they please.

Many items are also equipped with GPS devices.

Having a child wander off unsupervised can be a nightmare for any parent, but it can be especially troublesome if that child has autism. Independence Day Clothing includes tracking technology in several of its items, putting moms and dads at ease.

"Anytime I want to know where my child is, I whip out my iPhone — there's an app right there," Thierry told HuffPost Live in March 2015. "Four seconds later, I know exactly where [my son] is."

These clothes aren't just easy and stylish, they keep kids safer too. Photo courtesy of Lauren Thierry.

Lauren also has other cool items in the works, like sweaters, unisex shorts, and socks with no heel or toe seam.

Seriously, we want to see these designs rocking a red carpet soon. Photo courtesy of Lauren Thierry.

These clothes may be innovative. But to Lauren, her work comes down to simply wanting what's best for her kid.

While some may consider Independence Day Clothing "revolutionary" — as one media outlet proclaimed — she told Upworthy she sees it otherwise:

"What I did was not revolutionary. It was simply something that had to be done. Like the moms in the 1960s who safety pinned mittens to their kids coats before there were mitten clips. The moms did it because those 'kittens' might lose their 'mittens.' Revolutionary? No, just 'mom sense.'"

True

When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Photo by Adelin Preda on Unsplash

A multinational study found that bystanders intervene in 9 out of 10 public conflicts.

The recent news report of a woman on a Philadelphia train being raped while onlookers did nothing to stop it was shocking and horrible, without question. It also got people discussing the infamous "bystander effect," which has led people to believe—somewhat erroneously, as it turns out—that people aren't likely to intervene when they see someone being attacked in public. Stories like this uninterrupted train assault combined with a belief that bystanders rarely step in can easily lead people to feel like everything and everyone is horrible.

But according to the most recent research on the subject, the Philadelphia incident appears to be the exception, not the rule. A 2019 multinational study found that at least one bystander (but usually more) will actually intervene in 9 out of 10 public conflicts.

The idea that people in groups aren't likely to intervene stems largely from research on the 1964 story of Kitty Genovese, a 28-year-old woman who was stabbed to death outside her apartment in New York, while dozens of onlookers in surrounding apartment buildings allegedly did nothing. However, further research has called the number of witnesses into question, and it appears that several did, in fact, call the police. Someone reportedly shouted out their window and scared the attacker away for a few minutes, and someone did rush to Genovese's aid after the second attack.

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