the rock, psychology, dwayne johnson, inspiration, positive

Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson.

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson calls his company Seven Bucks Productions because that’s how much money he had in his pocket when he was cut from the Canadian Football League at the age of 23. It was at that moment he decided to pursue a career in professional wrestling, where he quickly became one of the most popular wrestlers in WWE history.

Then he became an actor and has been the star of some of the highest-grossing films of the past 20 years.

Johnson attributes his success to the incredible work ethic that his father taught him. As a wrestler, before every match he prayed for “the strength to leave it all in the ring—whether I was wrestling in flea markets or sold-out stadiums.”

That type of dedication and effort begins with a person’s attitude. Johnson recently shared a simple trick that he uses to reframe every situation into a positive experience. He replaces the phrase “I have to” with “I get to.”



Login • Instagram

This type of reframing is used by people who practice positive psychology, so Johnson probably didn’t come up with it on his own. But it’s great that he can use his tremendous platform to share it with people who may be unfamiliar.

He shared this simple but powerful advice on his Instagram page.

I’ll share a little philosophy with you guys that’s helped me achieve some success over the years.

When it comes to hard work and things I’m passionate about - years ago, I stopped saying “I have to” and started saying “I get to”.

Big psychological shift on how you approach the daily grind of shit we gotta get done

I “get to” train hard and push myself to the breaking point.

I “get to” get my ass kicked and come back stronger.

I “get to” be the hardest worker in the fucking room.

Because when you “get to” do the things you love - it’s a privilege.

Try switching “have to” to “get to” and start to feel that grind, gratitude & growth.

Johnson’s philosophy doesn’t just work for people who need the motivation to bench press 450 pounds. It can be used to change any situation into something you’re doing begrudgingly to an opportunity for growth. Focusing on the negative aspects of a situation prevents us from seeing opportunities or simply enjoying the moment.

For example, I “have to” write a paper for class can be easily reframed as I “get to” work to improve my writing skills and learn about something new. You could “have to” go to the DMV or you could “get to” spend 45 minutes reading a book while you wait.

Gillian Behnke, founder and CEO of Mom Camp, does a great job explaining the concept for parents on Thrive Global.

“One simple change of a word can help to reframe it and remind you that there is potential benefit in every situation,” she writes. “What might feel like an inconvenient favour at first might actually bring another person joy, and as a result, bring you joy in the process. I get to help someone who needs me.”

This change in perspective is also a way to practice gratitude. Studies show that gratitude opens the door to new relationships, improves psychological health and improves our self-esteem.

So next time you have to do something you dread, take a minute to find a way to reframe it as an opportunity for fun, growth or an opportunity to challenge yourself.

Leah Menzies/TikTok

Leah Menzies had no idea her deceased mother was her boyfriend's kindergarten teacher.

When you start dating the love of your life, you want to share it with the people closest to you. Sadly, 18-year-old Leah Menzies couldn't do that. Her mother died when she was 7, so she would never have the chance to meet the young woman's boyfriend, Thomas McLeodd. But by a twist of fate, it turns out Thomas had already met Leah's mom when he was just 3 years old. Leah's mom was Thomas' kindergarten teacher.

The couple, who have been dating for seven months, made this realization during a visit to McCleodd's house. When Menzies went to meet his family for the first time, his mom (in true mom fashion) insisted on showing her a picture of him making a goofy face. When they brought out the picture, McLeodd recognized the face of his teacher as that of his girlfriend's mother.

Menzies posted about the realization moment on TikTok. "Me thinking my mum (who died when I was 7) will never meet my future boyfriend," she wrote on the video. The video shows her and McLeodd together, then flashes to the kindergarten class picture.

“He opens this album and then suddenly, he’s like, ‘Oh my God. Oh my God — over and over again,” Menzies told TODAY. “I couldn’t figure out why he was being so dramatic.”

Obviously, Menzies is taking great comfort in knowing that even though her mother is no longer here, they can still maintain a connection. I know how important it was for me to have my mom accept my partner, and there would definitely be something missing if she wasn't here to share in my joy. It's also really incredible to know that Menzies' mother had a hand in making McLeodd the person he is today, even if it was only a small part.

@speccylee

Found out through this photo in his photo album. A moment straight out of a movie 🥲

♬ iris - 🫶

“It’s incredible that that she knew him," Menzies said. "What gets me is that she was standing with my future boyfriend and she had no idea.”

Since he was only 3, McLeodd has no actual memory of Menzies' mother. But his own mother remembers her as “kind and really gentle.”

The TikTok has understandably gone viral and the comments are so sweet and positive.

"No the chills I got omggg."

"This is the cutest thing I have watched."

"It’s as if she remembered some significance about him and sent him to you. Love fate 😍✨"

In the caption of the video, she said that discovering the connection between her boyfriend and her mom was "straight out of a movie." And if you're into romantic comedies, you're definitely nodding along right now.

Menzies and McLeodd made a follow-up TikTok to address everyone's positive response to their initial video and it's just as sweet. The young couple sits together and addresses some of the questions they noticed pop up. People were confused that they kept saying McLeodd was in kindergarten but only 3 years old when he was in Menzies' mother's class. The couple is Australian and Menzies explained that it's the equivalent of American preschool.

They also clarified that although they went to high school together and kind of knew of the other's existence, they didn't really get to know each other until they started dating seven months ago. So no, they truly had no idea that her mother was his teacher. Menzies revealed that she "didn't actually know that my mum taught at kindergarten."

"I just knew she was a teacher," she explained.

She made him act out his reaction to seeing the photo, saying he was "speechless," and when she looked at the photo she started crying. McLeodd recognized her mother because of the pictures Menzies keeps in her room. Cue the "awws," because this is so cute, I'm kvelling.

Photo by Heather Mount on Unsplash

Actions speak far louder than words.

It never fails. After a tragic mass shooting, social media is filled with posts offering thoughts and prayers. Politicians give long-winded speeches on the chamber floor or at press conferences asking Americans to do the thing they’ve been repeatedly trained to do after tragedy: offer heartfelt thoughts and prayers. When no real solution or plan of action is put forth to stop these senseless incidents from occurring so frequently in a country that considers itself a world leader, one has to wonder when we will be honest with ourselves about that very intangible automatic phrase.

Comedian Anthony Jeselnik brilliantly summed up what "thoughts and prayers" truly mean. In a 1.5-minute clip, Jeselnik talks about victims' priorities being that of survival and not wondering if they’re trending at that moment. The crowd laughs as he mimics the actions of well-meaning social media users offering thoughts and prayers after another mass shooting. He goes on to explain how the act of performatively offering thoughts and prayers to victims and their families really pulls the focus onto the author of the social media post and away from the event. In the short clip he expertly expresses how being performative on social media doesn’t typically equate to action that will help victims or enact long-term change.

Of course, this isn’t to say that thoughts and prayers aren’t welcomed or shouldn’t be shared. According to Rabbi Jack Moline "prayer without action is just noise." In a world where mass shootings are so common that a video clip from 2015 is still relevant, it's clear that more than thoughts and prayers are needed. It's important to examine what you’re doing outside of offering thoughts and prayers on social media. In another several years, hopefully this video clip won’t be as relevant, but at this rate it’s hard to see it any differently.

Moricz was banned from speaking up about LGBTQ topics. He found a brilliant workaround.

Senior class president Zander Moricz was given a fair warning: If he used his graduation speech to criticize the “Don’t Say Gay” law, then his microphone would be shut off immediately.

Moricz had been receiving a lot of attention for his LGBTQ activism prior to the ceremony. Moricz, an openly gay student at Pine View School for the Gifted in Florida, also organized student walkouts in protest and is the youngest public plaintiff in the state suing over the law formally known as the Parental Rights in Education law, which prohibits the discussion of sexual orientation or gender identity in grades K-3.

Though well beyond third grade, Moricz nevertheless was also banned from speaking up about the law, gender or sexuality. The 18-year-old tweeted, “I am the first openly-gay Class President in my school’s history–this censorship seems to show that they want me to be the last.”

However, during his speech, Moricz still delivered a powerful message about identity. Even if he did have to use a clever metaphor to do it.

Keep Reading Show less