More

The incredible story of how police and firefighters stepped in as subs after a tragedy.

This is a beautiful example of a community coming together to help each other in times of need.

In late August 2016, a beloved fifth-grade teacher passed away suddenly in Greenwood, Arkansas.

Jennifer Nelms taught at East Hills Middle School. "She just ... took whatever she was thrown and just spun it positively," Karen Benjamin, a teacher who worked in the same classroom as Nelms, told KFSM Channel 5.

Her coworkers say the young teacher had been diagnosed with lupus a couple of years ago, but her death from complications associated with the disease was unexpected. Benjamin said Nelms went home for the weekend not feeling well, thinking all she needed was a little rest. But she died the following day, leaving behind a husband and two sons.


The entire community came together and wore purple ribbons in her honor. Her fellow teachers were heartbroken, and they wanted to make sure everyone could pay their respects.

But the teachers weren't going to be able to attend the funeral because the district was low on substitute teachers.

That's when the community rallied around them to help.

About 15 police officers and firefighters, including the city's police and fire chiefs, substitute-taught in the teachers’ classrooms that day so everyone could attend Nelms’ funeral.

For Greenwood law enforcement and emergency teams, it was a no-brainer to step in.

Nelms' school recently sent out a big thank-you to the teams, explaining how much the gesture meant to the teachers and the kids:

The staff and administration would like to give a huge thanks to the members of the Greenwood Police Department,...

Posted by East Hills Middle School on Wednesday, August 24, 2016

The entire post reads:

"The staff and administration would like to give a huge thanks to the members of the Greenwood Police Department, Greenwood Fire Department, and East Hills PTO for all your support today covering classes and supervising our students during lunch and recess. Special thanks to the PTO for providing lunch to our staff, law enforcement officers, and firemen. We are blessed to have such an awesome and supportive community!"

This is a beautiful example of a community stepping up to help each other in times of need.

“Ms. Nelms was a supporter of the fire and police department,” Greenwood Fire Chief Stewart Bryan told KFSM Channel 5. “She's been a supporter of us for many years. Now that the school's in need, we wanted to help the school out. We wanted to make sure all the teachers were available to attend the funeral.”

Greenwood Police Chief William Dawson said it was an honor to be in a classroom that Nelms taught in. "She was a great person. Obviously loved by a lot of people and the students ... she's gonna be greatly missed."

Officers and students on the playground. Photo by East Hills Middle School/Facebook.

A tragic death like this is always hard to process, but often the best way to move forward is to allow everyone to come together and grieve. Sometimes all it takes is a little cross-community support to give people hope.

That first car is a rite of passage into adulthood. Specifically, the hard-earned lesson of expectations versus reality. Though some of us are blessed with Teslas at 17, most teenagers receive a car that’s been … let’s say previously loved. And that’s probably a good thing, considering nearly half of first-year drivers end up in wrecks. Might as well get the dings on the lemon, right?

Of course, wrecks aside, buying a used car might end up costing more in the long run after needing repairs, breaking down and just a general slew of unexpected surprises. But hey, at least we can all look back and laugh.

My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

Jimmy Fallon recently asked his “Tonight Show” audience on Twitter to share their own worst car experiences. Some of them make my brake fiasco look like cakewalk (or cakedrive, in this case). Either way, these responses might make us all feel a little less alone. Or at the very least, give us a chuckle.

Here are 22 responses with the most horsepower:

Keep Reading Show less
Joy

Teacher goes viral for her wholesome 'Chinese Dumpling Song'

Katie Norregaard has found her calling—teaching big lessons in little songs.

As educational as it is adorable.

On her TikTok profile, Katie Norregaard (aka Miss Katie) describes her brand as “if Mr. Rogers and AOC had a kid.” And it’s 100% accurate. The teaching artist has been going viral lately for her kid-friendly tunes that encourage kids to learn about other cultures, speak up for their values and be the best humans they can be.


@misskatiesings Reply to @typebteacher the internet gave me this brand one year ago and I haven’t looked back 🎶 ❤️ #fyp #misterrogers #preschool #aoc #teachertok ♬ She Share Story (for Vlog) - 山口夕依


Let’s face it, some kid’s songs are a tad abrasive with their cutesiness, to put it politely. A certain ditty about a shark pup comes to mind. Norregaard manages to bypass any empty saccharine-ness while still remaining incredibly sweet. The effortless warmth of her voice certainly helps with that. Again, she’s got that Mister Rogers vibe down to a tee.

“Miss Katie” has a treasure trove full of fun creations, such as her jazz version of “The Itsy Bitsy Spider,” but it’s her “Chinese Dumpling Song" that’s completely taking over the internet.
Keep Reading Show less

TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

Keep Reading Show less