Terry Crews has a simple way of describing toxic masculinity to men who don’t get it.

When the term “toxic masculinity” gets bandied about, some males immediately take offense, believing the term assumes that masculinity is toxic in and of itself.

However, that’s not what it means.

The term “toxic” is before the term “masculinity,” which means it’s a form of masculinity. Toxic masculinity can manifest itself as bullying, catcalling, suppressing emotions, maintaining an appearance of hardness, and using violence as an indicator of power.


“Toxic masculinity is what can come of teaching boys that they can’t express emotion openly; that they have to be 'tough all the time'; that anything other than that makes them 'feminine' or weak,” Maya Salam wrote in The New York Times.

One amazing example of a man who exhibits many of the positive characteristics of masculinity (strength, courage, humor) while rejecting its negative the aspects, is actor and former NFL player, Terry Crews ("Brooklyn Nine-Nine).

So when a Twitter user named Alpha-Male_10201 asked him to define toxic masculinity, his response was blunt and revealing.

Crews, who has a bodybuilder's physique, surprised a lot of people when he came out as a victim of sexual assault as part of the #MeToo movement.

Crews went public about being groped by a high-level Hollywood executive to “deter a predator and encourage someone who feels hopeless.”

Crews was approached about Toxic masculinity because of a larger debate happening between the actor and comedian D.L. Hughley. In August, Hughley told VLADTV, that Crews should have been able to fight off his attacker.

“I think it’s hard for me to think that a dude with all those muscles can’t tell an agent to not touch,” Hughley said.

Hughley’s remarks inspired a scathing response from Crews.

“Sir you said I should have pushed him back, or restrained him and I DID ALL THOSE THINGS . . . but you act like I didn’t,” Crews tweeted. “Were you there?”

“That’s different than slapping the s--- outa him,” Hughley retorted, prompting Crews to deliver a verbal smackdown. “So sir . . . If you truly feel that is a correct way to deal with toxic behavior . . . Should I slap the s--- out of you?” Crews asked.

The exchange inspired rapper Billy the Goat to start #SlapHimTerry to support "men holding other men accountable."

In the autumn of 1939, Chiune Sugihara was sent to Lithuania to open the first Japanese consulate there. His job was to keep tabs on and gather information about Japan's ally, Germany. Meanwhile, in neighboring Poland, Nazi tanks had already begun to roll in, causing Jewish refugees to flee into the small country.

When the Soviet Union invaded Lithuania in June of 1940, scores of Jews flooded the Japanese consulate, seeking transit visas to be able to escape to a safety through Japan. Overwhelmed by the requests, Sugihara reached out to the foreign ministry in Tokyo for guidance and was told that no one without proper paperwork should be issued a visa—a limitation that would have ruled out nearly all of the refugees seeking his help.

Sugihara faced a life-changing choice. He could obey the government and leave the Jews in Lithuania to their fate, or he could disobey orders and face disgrace and the loss of his job, if not more severe punishments from his superiors.

According to the Jewish Virtual Library, Sugihara was fond of saying, "I may have to disobey my government, but if I don't, I would be disobeying God." Sugihara decided it was worth it to risk his livelihood and good standing with the Japanese government to give the Jews at his doorstep a fighting chance, so he started issuing Japanese transit visas to any refugee who needed one, regardless of their eligibility.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

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Starbucks Upstanders Season 2

27 years ago, Debbie Baigrie was shot in the face during an attempted robbery. Her assailant was a 13-year-old boy.

Ian Manuel was the youngest of three boys who threatened Baigrie that night, but despite his age, he was the one holding the gun.

Ian Manuel in grade school. All photos provided by Starbucks.

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via Jess Martini / Tik Tok

There are few things as frightening to a parent than losing your child in a crowded place like a shopping mall, zoo, or stadium. The moment you realize your child is missing, it's impossible not to consider the terrifying idea they may have been kidnapped.

A woman in New Zealand recently lost her son in a Kmart but was able to locate him because of a potentially life-saving parenting hack she saw on TikTok a few months ago.

The woman was shopping at the retailer when she realized her two-year-old son Nathan was missing. She immediately told a friend to alert the staff to ensure he didn't leave through the store's front exit.

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