When the term “toxic masculinity” gets bandied about, some males immediately take offense, believing the term assumes that masculinity is toxic in and of itself.

However, that’s not what it means.

The term “toxic” is before the term “masculinity,” which means it’s a form of masculinity. Toxic masculinity can manifest itself as bullying, catcalling, suppressing emotions, maintaining an appearance of hardness, and using violence as an indicator of power.


“Toxic masculinity is what can come of teaching boys that they can’t express emotion openly; that they have to be 'tough all the time'; that anything other than that makes them 'feminine' or weak,” Maya Salam wrote in The New York Times.

One amazing example of a man who exhibits many of the positive characteristics of masculinity (strength, courage, humor) while rejecting its negative the aspects, is actor and former NFL player, Terry Crews ("Brooklyn Nine-Nine).

So when a Twitter user named Alpha-Male_10201 asked him to define toxic masculinity, his response was blunt and revealing.

Crews, who has a bodybuilder's physique, surprised a lot of people when he came out as a victim of sexual assault as part of the #MeToo movement.

Crews went public about being groped by a high-level Hollywood executive to “deter a predator and encourage someone who feels hopeless.”

Crews was approached about Toxic masculinity because of a larger debate happening between the actor and comedian D.L. Hughley. In August, Hughley told VLADTV, that Crews should have been able to fight off his attacker.

“I think it’s hard for me to think that a dude with all those muscles can’t tell an agent to not touch,” Hughley said.

Hughley’s remarks inspired a scathing response from Crews.

“Sir you said I should have pushed him back, or restrained him and I DID ALL THOSE THINGS . . . but you act like I didn’t,” Crews tweeted. “Were you there?”

“That’s different than slapping the s--- outa him,” Hughley retorted, prompting Crews to deliver a verbal smackdown. “So sir . . . If you truly feel that is a correct way to deal with toxic behavior . . . Should I slap the s--- out of you?” Crews asked.

The exchange inspired rapper Billy the Goat to start #SlapHimTerry to support "men holding other men accountable."

For the first time in its 56-year history, Sports Illustrated will feature a transgender model on its glossy cover. 23-year-old Brazilian model Valentina Sampaio will appear in the July issue, which hits stands early next week. Sampaio wrote on Instagram that she was "excited and honored" to be part of such an iconic issue, adding: "The team at SI has created yet another groundbreaking issue by bringing together a diverse set of multitalented, beautiful women in a creative and dignified way."

A native of Fortaleza, a city in northeastern Brazil, Sampaio has been making history in the fashion world in recent years. She was already the first trans model to make the 2017 cover of Vogue Paris. Scouted while she was a young teen, she quickly made her way onto key runways in her home country. She managed to make an impression in a short time— launching her career at 18 years old—as L'Oréal Paris's first trans model. She hit another milestone last year, when she was the face of Victoria's Secret campaign, breaking barriers as the first trans woman working with the brand.

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