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Internet strangers are helping each other manage chronic illnesses. It's wonderful.

The web can't cure chronic illness, but it can help make it seem less daunting.

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Seventh Generation

Being diagnosed with a chronic health problem can be terrifying and isolating — even more so if it means changing your diet, your lifestyle, and the products you bring into your home.

I know because it happened to me.

It was 2000, and I was 21 years old, broke, and sick when a new doctor diagnosed me with celiac disease. After a few visits, he told me I had celiac disease with lactose intolerance. If I wanted to start feeling better, I needed to cut out almost all grains and dairy products.

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Courtesy of Chef El-Amin
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When non-essential businesses in NYC were ordered to close in March, restaurants across the five boroughs were tasked to pivot fast or risk shuttering their doors for good.

The impact on the city's once vibrant restaurant scene was immediate and devastating. A national survey found that 250,000 people were laid off within 22 days and almost $2 billion in revenue was lost. And soon, numerous restaurant closures became permanent as the pandemic raged on and businesses were unable to keep up with rent and utility payments.

Hot Bread Kitchen, a New York City-based nonprofit and incubator that has assisted more than 275 local businesses in the food industry, knew they needed to support their affiliated businesses in a new light to navigate the financial complexities of shifting business models and applying for loans.

According to Hot Bread Kitchen's CEO Shaolee Sen, shortly after the shutdown began, a third of restaurant workers that they support had been laid off and another third were furloughed.

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