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Nobody can believe this image isn't Photoshopped or AI generated, but it's 100% real

You don't always need high tech to create mind-bending optical illusions.

Kenichi Ohno

"Gap" by Kenichi Ohno

Japanese photographer Kenichi Ohno has viewers scratching their heads with his seemingly doctored image of an egret stepping into shallow water. After receiving an honorable mention in the Nature in Japan photo contest organized by the All-Japan Association of Photographic Societies (AJAPS), the image went viral as folks tried to suss out whether or not it was the work of some kind of tech wizardry.


The photo, titled “Gap,” is in fact real. No Photoshop. No A.I. Just good ol’ fashioned photography know-how.

Taking a glance at the image below, it immediately looks as though the egret is superimposed against two different backgrounds. Or perhaps the colors were changed using editing software.

optical illusion

What sort of witchcraft is this?

The All-Japan Association of Photographic Societies, used with permission

However, in reality, the sun is hitting a wall (seen in the top right corner) at just the right angle so that the wall casts its reflection in the water. The wall is also yellow tinted, explaining the stark color contrast.

Still confused? Fret not. On its Facebook page, AJAPS provided a pulled-back photograph of the location, where the wall is clearly visible. Seeing the top of the wall and without the egret really puts things into perspective.

photography

Okay..it's starting to click

scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net

That certainly helps, doesn’t it?

And if things still aren’t clicking, this diagram really differentiates the different elements at play.

nature photography

Aha!

i.imgur.com

There. That makes sense, right? Phew. We got there.

You’re not alone. Folks online were just as baffled, intrigued and exhausted after finally figuring it out.

“I SAW IT! I SAW IT! I SAW IT AT LAST!” a person exclaimed on Reddit.

Another wrote, “Wowwwwwww…took me 5 whole minutes of shouting ‘wtf???’ Before I saw it. This one is really good.”

“It seems inexplicable until it clicks, and then suddenly you wonder how you could have seen anything but what it is,” wrote another.

Some people, even after figuring out how it worked, couldn't quite get their minds to believe it.

“After reading all the explanations I understand what it is…But I can’t bring my mind to reconcile this image,” one person commented.

I think this Reddit user pretty much summed up what we were all feeling in this statement:

“Brains are funny.”

On the contest website, AJAPS called the photo “amazing” and applauded its “strong impact.” Judges complimented the effort Ohno must have put in to be in the right place at the right time with near-perfect conditions (apparently this shot would have been impossible on a windy day).

“It teaches us that a small change can make a big difference in a photo. It's difficult to shoot nature when there are man-made objects, but in this case they play a good supporting role and enhance the photo,” the site said.

Indeed, make one small change and give the internet's most mind-boggling optical illusion to date. Well done, Ohno.

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10 anti-holiday recipes that prove the season can be tasty and healthy

Balance out heavy holiday eating with some lighter—but still delicious—fare.

Albertson's

Lighten your calorie load with some delicious, nutritious food between big holiday meals.

True

The holiday season has arrived with its cozy vibe, joyous celebrations and inevitable indulgences. From Thanksgiving feasts to Christmas cookie exchanges to Aunt Eva’s irresistible jelly donuts—not to mention leftover Halloween candy still lingering—fall and winter can feel like a non-stop gorge fest.

Total resistance is fairly futile—let’s be real—so it’s helpful to arm yourself with ways to mitigate the effects of eating-all-the-things around the holidays. Serving smaller amounts of rich, celebratory foods and focusing on slowly savoring the taste is one way. Another is to counteract those holiday calorie-bomb meals with some lighter fare in between.

Contrary to popular belief, eating “light” doesn’t have to be tasteless, boring or unsatisfying. And contrary to common practice, meals don’t have to fill an entire plate—especially when we’re trying to balance out heavy holiday eating.

It is possible to enjoy the bounties of the season while maintaining a healthy balance. Whether you prefer to eat low-carb or plant-based or gluten-free or everything under the sun, we’ve got you covered with these 10 easy, low-calorie meals from across the dietary spectrum.

Each of these recipes has less than 600 calories (most a lot less) per serving and can be made in less than 30 minutes. And Albertsons has made it easy to find O Organics® ingredients you can put right in your shopping cart to make prepping these meals even simpler.

Enjoy!

eggs and green veggies in a skillet, plate of baconNot quite green eggs and ham, but closeAlbertsons

Breakfast Skillet of Greens, Eggs & Ham

273 calories | 20 minutes

Ingredients:

1 (5 oz) pkg baby spinach

2 eggs

1 clove garlic

4 slices prosciutto

1/2 medium yellow onion

1 medium zucchini squash

1/8 cup butter, unsalted

1 pinch crushed red pepper

Find full instructions and shopping list here.

bow of cauliflower ham saladGet your cauliflower power on.Albertsons

Creamy Cauliflower Salad with Ham, Celery & Dill

345 calories | 20 minutes

1/2 medium head cauliflower

1 stick celery

1/4 small bunch fresh dill

8 oz. ham steak, boneless

1/2 shallot

1/4 tspblack pepper

1/4 tsp curry powder

2 tsp Dijon mustard

1/4 tsp garlic powder

3 Tbsp mayonnaise

1/8 tsp paprika

2 tsp red wine vinegar

1/2 tsp salt

Find full instructions and shopping list here.

tofu on skewers on a plate with coleslawPlant-based food fan? This combo looks yums. Albertsons

Grilled Chili Tofu Skewers with Ranch Cabbage, Apple & Cucumber Slaw

568 calories | 20 minutes

1 avocado

1/2 English cucumber

1 (12 oz.) package extra firm tofu

1 Granny Smith apple

3 Tbsp (45 ml) Ranch dressing

1/2 (14 oz bag) shredded cabbage (coleslaw mix)

2 tsp chili powder

1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1/2 tsp garlic powder

1/2 tsp salt

Find full instructions and shopping list here.

frittata in a cast iron skilletSometimes you just gotta frittata.Albertsons

Bell Pepper, Olive & Sun-Dried Tomato Frittata with Parmesan

513 calories | 25 minutes

6 eggs

1/2 cup Kalamata olives, pitted

2 oz Parmesan cheese

1 red bell pepper

1/2 medium red onion

8 sundried tomatoes, oil-packed

1/4 tsp black pepper

1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1/2 tsp Italian seasoning

1/4 tsp salt

Find full instructions and shopping list here.

plate with slices of grilled chicken and a caprese saladCaprese, if you please.Albertsons

Balsamic Grilled Chicken with Classic Caprese Salad

509 calories | 25 minutes

3/4 lb chicken breasts, boneless skinless

1/2 small pkg fresh basil

1/2 (8 oz pkg) fresh mozzarella cheese

1 clove garlic

3 tomatoes

1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

4 3/4 pinches black pepper

1 1/2 tsp extra virgin olive oil

3/4 tsp salt

Find full instructions and shopping list here.

four stuffed mushrooms on a plateThese mushrooms look positively poppable.Albertsons

Warm Goat Cheese, Parmesan & Sun-Dried Tomato Stuffed Mushrooms

187 calories | 35 minutes

1/2 lb cremini mushrooms

1 clove garlic

1/2 (4 oz) log goat cheese

1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded

2 sundried tomatoes, oil-packed

1 1/4 pinches crushed red pepper

1 tsp extra virgin olive oil

1/4 tsp Italian seasoning

2 pinches salt

Find full instructions and shopping list here.

plate with open English muffin with goat cheese and sliced baby tomatoes on topMove over, avocado toast. English muffin pizzas have arrived.Albertsons

English Muffin Pizzas with Basil Pesto, Goat Cheese & Tomatoes

327 calories | 10 minutes

3 Tbsp (45 ml) basil pesto

2 English muffins

1/2 (4 oz) log goat cheese

1/2 pint grape tomatoes

3/4 pinch black pepper

2 pinches salt

Find full instructions and shopping list here.

pita pocket on a plate filled with veggies, meat and cheeseThis pita pocket packs a colorful punch.Albertsons

Warm Pita Pocket with Turkey, Cheddar, Roasted Red Peppers & Parsley

313 calories | 20 minutes

1/4 (8 oz) block cheddar cheese

1/2 bunch Italian (flat-leaf) parsley

4 oz oven roasted turkey breast, sliced

1/2 (12 oz) jar roasted red bell peppers

1 whole grain pita

3/4 pinch black pepper

1/2 tsp Dijon mustard

2 tsp mayonnaise

Find full instructions and shopping list here.

plate with toast smeared with avocado and topped with prosciuttoDid we say, "Move over, avocado toast?" What we meant was "Throw some prosciutto on it!" Albertsons

Avocado Toast with Crispy Prosciutto

283 calories | 10 minutes

1 avocado

2 slices prosciutto

2 slices whole grain bread

1 5/8 tsp black pepper

1/2 tsp extra virgin olive oil

1/8 tsp garlic powder

1/8 tsp onion powder

Find full instructions and shopping list here.

bowl of chili with cheese and green onions on topVegetarian chili with a fall twistAlbertsons

Black Bean & Pumpkin Chili with Cheddar

444 calories | 30 minutes

2 (15 oz can) black beans

1/2 (8 oz ) block cheddar cheese

2 (14.5 oz) cans diced tomatoes

2 cloves garlic

2 green bell peppers

1 small bunch green onions (scallions)

1 (15 oz) can pure pumpkin purée

1 medium yellow onion

1/2 tsp black pepper

5 7/8 tsp chili powder

1/2 tsp cinnamon

2 tsp cumin, ground

1 tsp salt

1 Tbsp virgin coconut oil

Find full instructions and shopping list here.

For more delicious and nutritious recipes, visit albertsons.com/recipes.

Health

Artists got fed up with these 'anti-homeless spikes.' So they made them a bit more ... comfy.

"Our moral compass is skewed if we think things like this are acceptable."

Photo courtesy of CC BY-ND, Immo Klink and Marco Godoy

Spikes line the concrete to prevent sleeping.


These are called "anti-homeless spikes." They're about as friendly as they sound.

As you may have guessed, they're intended to deter people who are homeless from sitting or sleeping on that concrete step. And yeah, they're pretty awful.

The spikes are a prime example of how cities design spaces to keep homeless people away.

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It's getting harder to drive at night.

In recent years, a trend on the roads has frustrated many drivers: the increasing brightness of car headlights. While driving at night, drivers often forced to squint or are momentarily blinded by these ultra-bright lights, especially on high beams.

It’s annoying, and it’s also a safety hazard. But it doesn’t seem like anyone is doing anything about it.

New cars have brighter headlights because of the shift in manufacturing from halogen headlamps with a softer, orange color to blue-colored LED lights. “Imagine a car with two headlights: one halogen, one LED. They’d both meet the requirements. The light meter would say they’re the same, but the LED would look 40% brighter,” Mark Rea, professor at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, said, according to The Hill.

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Image shared by Madalyn Parker

Madalyn shared with her colleagues about her own mental health.


Madalyn Parker wanted to take a couple days off work. She didn't have the flu, nor did she have plans to be on a beach somewhere, sipping mojitos under a palm tree.

Parker, a web developer from Michigan, wanted a few days away from work to focus on her mental health.

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Pets

Lonely baby camel, 'Sir Camelot' gets his very own best friend: A baby cow

The camel would stand and cry because the other animals refused to play.

Lonely baby camel becomes best friends with a baby cow

There's something innately heartwarming about two unlikely animals becoming best friends. Whether it's a cat and a dog (which happens fairly often) or its a duck and a hamster, people can't get enough of these unusual animal pairings. But this particular animal pairing is almost beyond the imagination with how ridiculously cute it is.

A baby camel named Sir Camelot was rescued by Speranza Animal Rescue and he quickly found out that the other animals didn't want to be his friend. His humans tried hard to pair him up with some of the other animals but even the horses wanted nothing to do with the camel, running away every time he came near. It clearly hurt the baby's feelings because he would stand and scream when the other animals would run away from him.

Enter Benjamin Button, a baby cow that was just two weeks younger than Camelot. When Benjamin arrived at the animal rescue neither him or Camelot knew what to make of each other, but it only took one night before the pair was bonded.

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Family

Man lists 8 not fun, but very important things you need to start doing as an adult.

"Welcome to being an adult. Maybe you weren't told this by your parents, but this is through my trial and error."

@johnfluenzer/TikTok

8 things you should be doing as an adult. Spoiler alert—none of them are fun.

Who among us hasn’t come into full adulthood wishing they had known certain things that could have made life so so so much easier in the long run? Choices that, if made, ultimately would have been much better for our well-being…not to mention our wallets.

But then again that is all part of growing older and (hopefully) wiser. However there is something to be said about getting advice from those who’ve been there, rather than learning the hard way every single time.

Thankfully, a man who goes by @johnfluenzer on TikTok has a great list of things young people should start doing once they become adults. Are any of his suggestions fun, cool or trendy? Not at all. But they are most definitely accurate. Just ask any 30+-year-olds who wished they had done at least four of these things.
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A woman was offered $200,000 for her dog.

For most dog owners, their pooch is a member of the family, best friend, confidante, and loyal protector. They would never dream of giving their dog away to anyone, let alone selling their pet. However, what if the offer was $200,000?

A TikTokker named Alexis Elliott says she received a “legit” offer of $200,000 for her Doberman pinscher puppy, but refused because she wouldn’t dream of selling her dog.

“Someone offered us $200K for our puppy, and I told my husband ‘absolutely f*cking not,’” the TikToker said. “Would you guys sell your dogs for $200k?” she asks later in the video. “Like, that is my baby! That is my baby. I birthed her. That is my child. Like there is no money, I would not sell her. But it just got me thinking, like, I wonder if people would have taken that 200K?"

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