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Kid drops 100% wholesome f-bombs in gift for his brother, and parents can't stop giggling

Ah, the innocent hilarity of phonics.

child swimming in a pool
adrift1/Canva

Sweet kiddo made an unintentionally hilarious "pool certificate" for his brother who had completed swim lessons.

Kids say the darndest things, it's true. But sometimes they write the darndest things, too.

Exhibit No. 1: This kid's homemade swim lesson completion certificate for his brother.

In a video shared by faith-based influencer Barrett Bogan on Instagram, with a caption that reads, "Homemade certificates be like… 🤣🤣🤣🤣 I have NO words BAHAHAHA🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣 To the PURE all things are pure yo! 🤣🤣🤣🤣," we see a young child sharing a "pool certificate" he made for his brother Brighton in honor of his completing his swimming lessons.

So sweet, right? Only one problem—it doesn't really say, "certificate."


In a wholesomely hilarious mixup of phonics, the darling kiddo not only spelled out two very clear f-bombs in all caps, but he dropped them both in the form of a common f-bomb phrase.

And to add even more adorableness to the mix, he calmly describes his creation to his parents in the video, innocently oblivious to the riotous laughter happening inside their heads.

To their credit, his folks keep it together on the outside—for the most part. We can see Mom having to turn away to stifle a giggle at the beginning, and Dad only laughs when he turns the camera on himself before uttering, "Thank you, Jesus."

Watch:

Could they have explained to their son what was so funny about this? Sure. But as a parent, it's hard when you're caught off guard, especially when a child's innocence is involved. They may not have wanted to or been prepared to explain the ins and outs of the f-word to their young son at that moment, and doing so would surely have detracted from the absolute sweetness of his gesture for his brother.

But the people of the internet, especially teachers, loved the unintentional bomb drop:

"As a teacher, he did well writing using known words and sounds. Good job buddy!" wrote @seagoddess76.

As a teacher he gets an A+ for sounding out ALL those words😂😂😂," shared @queenbee_111.

"As a teacher, this is something we see all the time," added @gracedbygrit. "As students learn phonetic sounds and apply those sounds in writing (encoding) they will often make other words, most often ones that are profane, without realizing it. When they read it they are only focusing on the sounds the letters make not the resulting incidental order of them that may form other words. Purely innocent. 🤷🏽♀️"

Many commenters encouraged the parents to keep the "certificate" to show him when he's older so he can have a laugh of his own.

"When he graduates with his masters from MIT, show this to him," wrote @sarahdoeslife. "Please tell him that we, his internet aunts and uncles, loved his phonetic spelling then and how we all took a moment to enjoy his genius then. He made us smile."

"One day when he’s older, he will laugh his head off! Bless his heart!" wrote @dianalynndesoto. "He was so proud of what he had made his brother. ❤️"

"That needs to be framed and gifted to him when he graduates with his PhD," added @billzankich.

Gotta appreciate the innocence of children and the unintentional humor that sometimes results from it. Awesome job, kiddo.

Albertsons

No child should have to worry about getting enough food to thrive.

True

When you’re a kid, summer means enjoying the fun of the season—plentiful sunshine, free time with friends, splashing in pools and sprinklers. But not every child’s summer is as carefree as it should be.

For some, summer means going hungry. According to Feeding America, food insecurity affects 1 in 8 children in the U.S., largely because families lose the free or reduced-price meals at school that help keep them fed during the school year.

But back-to-school time doesn’t make food insecurity disappear, either. Hunger is a year-round issue, and with the increased cost of groceries, it’s gotten harder for families who were already struggling to put food on the table.

So what can be done—or more specifically, what can the average person do—to help?

The good news is that one simple choice at the grocery store can help ease the burden a bit for those experiencing food insecurity. And the even better news is that it’s also a healthy choice for ourselves, our families and our planet. When we’re out on our regular shopping trips, we can simply look for the O Organics versions of things we would already buy.

But wait—aren’t we all feeling the pinch at the checkout stand? And isn’t organic food expensive? Here’s the thing: Organic food is often much more affordable than you might think. The cost difference between organic and non-organic products keeps narrowing, and many organic and non-organic foods are now almost identical in price. Sometimes you’ll even find that an organic product is actually cheaper than its brand-name non-organic counterpart.

Since 2005, O Organics has helped give health-conscious shoppers more options by making organic food more accessible and affordable. And now, it’s helping those same shoppers take action to fight food insecurity. For every O Organics product you purchase, the company will donate a meal to someone in need through the Albertsons Companies Foundation—for up to a total of 28 million meals.

Look for the O Organics label in every aisle.O Organics

Here’s what that means in real-world terms:

Say you’re throwing an end-of-summer backyard BBQ bash. If you were to buy O Organics ground beef, hamburger buns, ketchup and sea salt potato chips, you’d be donating four meals just by buying those four ingredients. If you added O Organics butter lettuce and O Organics sandwich slice pickles, you’d be donating two more meals, and so on.

And where are those meals going? Albertsons Companies Foundation works with a network of national and local charities fighting hunger, and regional divisions choose organizations to fund locally. So every O Organics product you purchase means a meal on the table for someone in your area who might not otherwise have the nourishment they need.

No kid should have to worry about getting enough food to thrive. We all make conscious choices each time we walk down a grocery store aisle, and by choosing

O Organics, we can make a difference in a child’s life while also making healthy choices for ourselves and our families. It’s truly a win-win.
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