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Justin Trudeau is marching in a pride parade. Yeah, it's a big deal.

If you're a fan of human rights, you probably like Justin Trudeau.

Justin Trudeau is marching in a pride parade. Yeah, it's a big deal.

This week, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made an unprecedented move when it comes to LGBT rights and visibility.

If you're someone who's paid close attention to his record on LGBT issues, the news likely isn't all that surprising. It might not seem like it's that big of a deal, but it's still historic.


Photo by Geoff Robins/AFP/Getty Images.

Trudeau will be Canada's first prime minister to march in Toronto's Pride Parade.

The popular PM plans to participate in the event this coming July alongside the country's first openly gay premier, Ontario's Kathleen Wynne, BBC News reported.

Trudeau — who's in favor of expanding protections for transgender Canadians and is seeking to end the outdated, homophobic barriers that prevent gay men from donating blood — is "very much look[ing] forward to being there again, this time as PM," he tweeted on Feb. 22, 2016.

“[It’s] big news in Canada, but big news around the world,” Mathieu Chantelois, Pride Toronto’s executive director, told BuzzFeed Canada.

If you're a big fan of social progress, you're probably a fan of Trudeau.

Of course, he hasn't been without his fair share of criticism throughout the years — like when he got called out for flip-flopping on gun laws or, more recently, caught flak from some political opponents for using taxpayer funds to pay family nannies (a move he defended).

By and large, however, Trudeau has been heralded as a leader moving Canada forward on human rights and equality.

Like when he appointed women to half his cabinet because, well, "it's 2015," as he put it.

Or when he called on more men to embrace the term "feminist."

GIF via the World Economic Forum.

And remember that time he welcomed Syrian refugees to Canada with open arms?


GIF via BBC News/YouTube.

Yeah, that was great too.

He's also been an advocate for mending Canada's divisive relationship with its indigenous peoples and he made sure that his gender-equal cabinet was ethnically diverse as well.

Trudeau's decision to march may not seem like a very big deal in a country often seen as America's more liberal friend to the north.

But it is — even for Canada. Because pride parades aren't just about rainbow flags and colorful floats. They're symbolic of a community embracing its queer brothers and sisters as one. To have a world leader fully embracing that idea is history worth remembering.

Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.