Jeff Goldblum was caught on video dancing at ‘Gay Mardi Gras’ and, for a moment, the world was perfect
via Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Sixty-six-year-old eccentric actor Jeff Goldblum is a rarity in Hollywood as he seems to be getting more popular with age.

He's known for his special brand of off-kilter charm that stole scenes in Wes Anderson films such as "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou" films and box offices smashes including "Jurassic Park" and "Independence Day."

Recently, he's become a popular character on social media earning the title "beloved living meme" by The Washington Post's Elahe Izadi.




Need further evidence of Goldblum's unique brand of fame? To celebrate the 25th anniversary of "Jurassic Park" a 25-foot-tall statue of the actor shirtless appeared last year in London.

Goldblum has embraced his unique role in American pop culture by even going so far as to rate his memes.

Goldblum is such a unique screen presence that he is often cast to play himself, but he doesn't mind.

"People write Jeff Goldblum-y parts and they want me to do them, and that's fine," he told Vanity Fair. "I think I can even do a better version of it. So no, this little Jeff Goldblum row that I'm hoeing is still adventurous."

RELATED: Christopher Walken dancing in over 50 movies all perfectly spliced into a single music video

Over the weekend, Goldblum upped his cool cred by being caught dancing to Normani's "Motivation" at Southern Decadence in New Orleans. Southern Decadence got its start in 1972 and is a debaucherous party that's also known as Gay Mardi Gras.

The six-foot-four inch Goldblum was spotted slowly, but confidently, shaking his stuff on a rooftop in front of a crowd of onlookers in the French Quarter wearing a clashing animal print ensemble.

Most people wouldn't be able to pull off that kind of look, but Jeff Goldblum is not most people.

According to NOLA Goodblum was at the parade for a Disney-produced documentary on glitter.

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Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

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Maria Oswalt /Unsplash (left), Wikimedia Commons (right)

Few topics are as politically polarizing as the issue of abortion. Those of us who are middle aged and younger have always known the abortion debate divided between the political right and left, conservatives and liberals, Republicans and Democrats.

But that has not always been the case.

In fact, it was mostly Republican-nominated Supreme Court Justices who made the case for choice in 1973.

Roe vs. Wade was decided with a 7-2 vote, and not along partisan lines. Those who ruled in favor were as follows, with the president who nominated them and the party of that president indicated in parentheses:

  • Harry Blackmun (Nixon, R)
  • Lewis Powell (Nixon, R)
  • Warren Burger (Nixon, R)
  • William Brennan (Eisenhower, R)
  • Potter Stewart (Eisenhower, R)
  • Thurgood Marshall (LBJ, D)
  • William Douglas (FDR, D)

Those who dissented on Roe vs. Wade:

  • Byron White (Kennedy, D)
  • William Rehnquist (Nixon, R)

So five Republican-nominated justices and two Democrat-nominated justices ruled for choice, while one Republican and one Democrat-nominated justice ruled against.

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Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

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The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn’t something we’d choose—and we’d hope others wouldn’t choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

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via msleja / TikTok

In 2019, the Washoe County School District in Reno, Nevada instituted a policy that forbids teachers from participating in "partisan political activities" during school hours. The policy states that "any signage that is displayed on District property that is, or becomes, political in nature must be removed or covered."

The new policy is based on the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 Janus decision that limits public employees' First Amendment protections for speech while performing their official duties.

This new policy caused a bit of confusion with Jennifer Leja, a 7th and 8th-grade teacher in the district. She wondered if, as a bisexual woman, the new policy forbids her from discussing her sexuality.

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