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Good-bye plastic: Lego announces a huge change in the future of its toys.

Get ready to say good-bye to the Legos of yesteryear.

Good-bye plastic: Lego announces a huge change in the future of its toys.

Legos. A classic children's toy.

The literal building blocks of imagination can bring many hours of joy.


Just take a look at that imagination! Photo by mureut/Flickr.

Hours of joy that are quickly forgotten when you step on them and want to die from the pain.

One thing I don't miss after giving away my Legos. GIF from Jerry Purpdrank/Vine.

To say that Legos are popular would be an understatement.

People love them! In 2012, over 45 billion Lego pieces were made, and enough were sold that year to circle the world 18 times.

That's A LOT of plastic.

Literally 6,000 tons of plastic each year. And we all know how bad plastic is for the environment.

Just a drop in the bucket. Photo by Curtis McHale/Flickr.

That's why the Lego Group just made a huge announcement about the future of Lego building blocks.

They're going to invest 1 BILLION Danish Krone (which is about $150 million USD) in a program that'll make the Lego blocks we know and love even better!

They're going to spend the money to hire 100 amazing, smart people to figure out materials that aren't harmful to the environment that can be used to make Legos instead.

An example of smart people. Image by U.S. Army RDECOM/Flickr.

They're establishing the Lego Sustainable Materials Center, which is the latest move by Lego to reduce its carbon footprint.

Currently, Legos are made out of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, which is a long way of saying "really strong plastic."

Knowing how much the colorful little blocks can hurt the Earth, Lego's been trying to do things that are better for the environment, like using less paper in their packaging and investing in an offshore wind farm.

In the announcement about the recent commitment, Lego Group owner Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen (who is the grandson of Lego founder, Ole Kirk Kristiansen — how cool is that?) said:

"The investment announced is a testament to our continued ambition to leave a positive impact on the planet, which future generations will inherit. It is certainly in line with the mission of the LEGO Group and in line with the motto of my grandfather and founder of the LEGO Group, Ole Kirk Kristiansen: 'Only the best is good enough.'"

Thank you, Lego, for working hard to help us continue to bring our imaginations to life — without destroying the environment.

Take a look at their announcement in its entirety.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Photo by Adelin Preda on Unsplash

A multinational study found that bystanders intervene in 9 out of 10 public conflicts.

The recent news report of a woman on a Philadelphia train being raped while onlookers did nothing to stop it was shocking and horrible, without question. It also got people discussing the infamous "bystander effect," which has led people to believe—somewhat erroneously, as it turns out—that people aren't likely to intervene when they see someone being attacked in public. Stories like this uninterrupted train assault combined with a belief that bystanders rarely step in can easily lead people to feel like everything and everyone is horrible.

But according to the most recent research on the subject, the Philadelphia incident appears to be the exception, not the rule. A 2019 multinational study found that at least one bystander (but usually more) will actually intervene in 9 out of 10 public conflicts.

The idea that people in groups aren't likely to intervene stems largely from research on the 1964 story of Kitty Genovese, a 28-year-old woman who was stabbed to death outside her apartment in New York, while dozens of onlookers in surrounding apartment buildings allegedly did nothing. However, further research has called the number of witnesses into question, and it appears that several did, in fact, call the police. Someone reportedly shouted out their window and scared the attacker away for a few minutes, and someone did rush to Genovese's aid after the second attack.

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