+
upworthy
Democracy

Last year, this Fox News host explained why Trump shouldn't be allowed to run again

Juan Williams says there's a strong legal case to block Trump from ever becoming president again.

Last year, this Fox News host explained why Trump shouldn't be allowed to run again
via jlhervàs / Flickr

This article originally appeared on 08.17.21


If Donald Trump decides to run for president in 2024, there's a good chance that he'll win the Republican nomination. A recent survey from the John Bolton Super PAC found that 46% of likely general election voters would back Trump being the party's nominee.

Florida governor Ron DeSantis came in a distant second with 13% support.


Trump's latest fundraising figures show that he has a whopping $102 million war chest to finance a run in 2024.

Trump's former chief of staff Mark Meadows said that the former president recently met with "cabinet members" to discuss his political future and that they're "moving forward" in a "real way."

It's hard to believe that a president who inspired an insurrection at the Capitol building and did everything he could to overturn the results of an election could still have a single supporter, let alone tens of millions.

Shouldn't there be a law that prevents people who attack the very fabric of American democracy from having the honor of holding its highest office? Fox News contributor Juan Williams believes there is a strong legal case to deny Trump the ability to run again.

Williams is a liberal outlier at the news outlet and was a regular co-host on Fox's "The Five." He stepped down from the role on the show earlier this year after contracting COVID-19.

In an op-ed for The Hill, Williams makes the case that Attorney General Merrick Garland can prevent Trump from running again by invoking Section 3 of the 14th Amendment which bars anyone from holding office who "engaged in insurrection" against the U.S.

No Person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, or elector of President and Vice-President, or hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a member of any State legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove such disability.

"The facts say Trump tried to stage a coup," Williams wrote.

Williams cites three actions by Trump that prove he engaged in insurrection.

He tried to hamstring acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen into saying the election was "corrupt."

"Just say the election was corrupt [and] leave the rest to me and the [Republican] congressmen," Trump told Jeffrey Rosen, then the acting attorney general, in a December phone call.

In the weeks before that call, Trump also pressured his Attorney General William Barr to do the same. "We realized from the beginning it was just bullshit," Barr later told ABC News's Jonathan Karl.

The former president also tried to get Georgia's secretary of State, Brad Raffensperger to "find" him votes to help him win the state.

"So, yes, there is a case to be made that Trump committed crimes against America," Williams wrote.

In a recent op-ed for The Washington Post, lawyers Laurence Tribe, Barbara McQuade, and Joyce White Vance urged Garland to block Trump from running again. "The bottom line is this: Now that Trump is out of office, the DOJ's view that sitting presidents cannot be indicted no longer shields him. Attempted coups cannot be ignored," they wrote.

"If Garland's Justice Department is going to restore respect for the rule of law, no one, not even a former president can be above it," the op-ed continued.

When Donald Trump was elected president he swore to "preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States." His failure to do so should not only make him an unworthy choice for the American people but disqualify him from having the opportunity in the first place.

Williams makes a compelling argument that that Trump is legally ineligible to run again.

"Yes, Garland has the power to stop Trump from running again," Williams wrote. "It is time to use it."

Family

Man lists 8 not fun, but very important things you need to start doing as an adult.

"Welcome to being an adult. Maybe you weren't told this by your parents, but this is through my trial and error."

@johnfluenzer/TikTok

8 things you should be doing as an adult. Spoiler alert—none of them are fun.

Who among us hasn’t come into full adulthood wishing they had known certain things that could have made life so so so much easier in the long run? Choices that, if made, ultimately would have been much better for our well-being…not to mention our wallets.

But then again that is all part of growing older and (hopefully) wiser. However there is something to be said about getting advice from those who’ve been there, rather than learning the hard way every single time.

Thankfully, a man who goes by @johnfluenzer on TikTok has a great list of things young people should start doing once they become adults. Are any of his suggestions fun, cool or trendy? Not at all. But they are most definitely accurate. Just ask any 30+-year-olds who wished they had done at least four of these things.
Keep ReadingShow less
With permission from Sarah Cooper.

Men and the feels.


Note: This an excerpt is from Sarah Cooper's book, How to Be Successful Without Hurting Men's Feelings.

In this fast-paced business world, female leaders need to make sure they're not perceived as pushy, aggressive, or competent.

One way to do that is to alter your leadership style to account for the fragile male ego.

Keep ReadingShow less

Doorbell camera catches boy's rant about mom's chicken

When you're a kid you rarely have a lot of say in what you get to eat for dinner. The adult in your house is the one that gets to decide and you have to eat whatever they put on your plate. But one little boy is simply tired of eating chicken and he doesn't care who knows it. Well, he cares if his mom knows.

Lacy Marie uploaded a video from her doorbell camera to TikTok her son. The little boy is caught on camera taking the trash out venting about always having to eat chicken. He rants all the way to the trash can, being sure to get it out of his system before he makes it back into the house.

"Chicken. No more chicken. Tell me you like, we have chicken every day. Eat this, eat that, eat more chicken, keep eating it," the 10-year-old complains. "It's healthy for you. Like, we get it. We have chicken every day."

Keep ReadingShow less
Joy

Her boyfriend asked her to draw a comic about their relationship. Hilarity ensued.

The series combines humor and playful drawings with spot-on depictions of the intense familiarity that long-standing coupledom often brings.

All images by Catana Chetwynd


"It was all his idea."

An offhand suggestion from her boyfriend of two years coupled with her own lifelong love of comic strips like "Calvin and Hobbes" and "Get Fuzzy" gave 22-year-old Catana Chetwynd the push she needed to start drawing an illustrated series about long-term relationships.

Specifically, her own relationship.

Keep ReadingShow less
Identity

My wife surprised her coworkers when she came out as trans. Then they surprised her.

She was ready for one reaction but was greeted with a beautiful response.

All photos by Amanda Jette, used with permission.

Zoe comes out to her coworkers.


Society, pay attention. This is important.

My wife, Zoe, is transgender. She came out to us — the kids and me — last summer and then slowly spread her beautiful feminine wings with extended family, friends, and neighbors.

A little coming out here, a little coming out there — you know how it is.

Keep ReadingShow less


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


Keep ReadingShow less