In a new interview, Emma Watson reveals she's no longer single, but 'self-partnered'
via British Vogue / YouTube

Single women in their 30s can face a lot of stigma from their friends, family, and society at-large.

It seems everyone wants them to be married, have a house, and multiple children by the time they enter their third decade. The fear is that if they don't adhere to these narrow ideas of femininity, that they will wind up lonely and depressed for the rest of their lives.


That's making the assumption that women with children and a significant other are somehow happier than those who are single. It also assumes that a woman cannot be fulfilled by their careers and hobbies or by simply being themselves.

Paul Dolan, a professor of behavioral science at the London School of Economics, says that marriage and children don't necessarily make a woman happier. In fact, for many, it's the opposite.

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"We do have some good longitudinal data following the same people over time, but I am going to do a massive disservice to that science and just say: if you're a man, you should probably get married; if you're a woman, don't bother.," Doan said at the hay Festival.

"The healthiest and happiest population subgroup are women who never married or had children," he continued.

via UN Women

Actress Emma Watson, who plays Meg in the upcoming "Little Woman," is turning 30 soon but has decided to let go of the pressure that comes it and has a new way of defining what it means to be single.

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"I was like, 'Why does everyone make such a big fuss about turning 30? This is not a big deal…'" she told British Vogue.

"Cut to 29, and I'm like, 'Oh my God, I feel so stressed and anxious. And I realize it's because there is suddenly this bloody influx of subliminal messaging around," she said.

"If you have not built a home, if you do not have a husband, if you do not have a baby, and you are turning 30, and you're not in some incredibly secure, stable place in your career, or you're still figuring things out," she continued. "There's just this incredible amount of anxiety."

Regardless of what society thinks about single women in their 30s, Watson sees it as a sign of strength.

"I never believed the whole 'I'm happy single' spiel," she continued. "I was like, 'This is totally spiel.' It took me a long time, but I'm very happy [being single]. I call it being self-partnered."

There is something very powerful in Watson's ability to find self-fulfillment. Some of us are so busy looking to be fulfilled by other people whether they are romantic partners, friends, and family, that we don't realize that, in the end, we have the ability to be happy all by ourselves.

Further, finding a sense of self-fulfillment can make our relationships even stronger because we are not in relationships built on dependency.

Here's the entire interview.

Courtesy of Verizon
True

If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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