+
funny animal photos, comedy wildlife, wildlife photography

Comedy Wildlife Award Winners 2021.

Six years ago, the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards started humbly as a small photo contest. But it's grown to be a worldwide renowned competition seen by millions across the globe. The photos are always funny but they come with a serious message: We need to protect the natural world.

This year's winner is "Ouch!" a photo of a Golden Silk Monkey who appears to have injured the family jewels by landing on a wire with his legs open. The photo was taken by Ken Jensen in 2016.

"I was absolutely overwhelmed to learn that my entry had won, especially when there were quite a number of wonderful photos entered," Jensen said in a statement. "The publicity that my image has received over the last few months has been incredible, it is such a great feeling to know that one's image is making people smile globally as well as helping to support some fantastically worthwhile conservation causes."


Winner: Ken Jensen "Ouch!" (Golden Silk Monkey, China)

Golden Silk Monkey, China.

©Ken Jensen/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

This is actually a show of aggression, however in the position that the monkey is in it looks quite painful!

Affinity People's Choice Winner: John Spiers "I Guess Summer's Over" (Pigeon, Oban, Argyll, Scotland)

©John Spiers/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

"I was taking pics of pigeons in flight when this leaf landed on the bird's face." – John Spiers

Creatures of the Land Winner: Arthur Trevino "Ninja Prairie Dog" (Bald Eagle, Longmont, U.S.A.)

©ArthurTrevino/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

When this Bald Eagle missed its attempt to grab this prairie dog, it jumped toward the eagle and startled it long enough to escape to a nearby burrow. A real David vs. Goliath story!

Creatures Under Water Winner: Chee Kee Teo "Time for School" (Smooth-Coated Otter, Singapore)

©Chee Kee Teo/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

A smooth-coated otter "bit" its baby otter to bring it back for a swimming lesson.

Portfolio: Vicki Jauron "Joy of Mud Bath" (Elephant, Matusadona Park, Zimbabwe)

©Vicki Jauron/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

An elephant expresses its joy in taking a mud bath against the dead trees on the shores of Lake Kariba in Zimbabwe on a hot afternoon.

Highliy Commended Winners: Andy Parkinson "Let's Dance" (Brown Bear Cubs, Kamchatka Peninsula, Far East Russia)

©Andy Parkinson/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

Two Kamchatka bear cubs square up for a celebratory play fight having successfully navigated a raging torrent (small stream!).

Chu Han Lin "See Who Jumps High" (Mudskipper, Taiwan)

©Chu Han Lin/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

I have the high ground!

David Eppley "The Majestic and the Graceful Bald Eagle" (Bald Eagle, Florida, U.S.A.)

©David Eppley/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

Bald eagles will use the same nest for years, even decades, adding new material to it at the beginning and throughout the nesting season. Normally, they are highly skilled at snapping branches off trees while in flight. Possibly tired from working nonstop all morning on a new nest, this particular bald eagle wasn't showing its best form.

Yes, sometimes they miss. Although this looks painful, and it might very well be, the eagle recovered with just a few sweeping wing strokes, and chose to rest a bit before making another lumber run.

Gurumoorthy K "The Green Stylist" (Indian Chameleon, Western Ghats)

©Gurumoorthy K/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

Just who do you think you're looking at?

Jakub Hodáñ "Treehugger" (Proboscis Monkey, Borneo)

©Jakub Hodáñ/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

This proboscis monkey could be just scratching its nose on the rough bark, or it could be kissing it. Trees play a big role in the lives of monkeys. Who are we to judge?

Jan Piecha "Chinese Whispers" (Raccoon, Kassel, Germany)

©Jan Piecha/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

The little raccoon cubs are telling secrets to each other.

Lea Scaddan "Missed" (Kangaroo, Perth, Australia)

©Lea Scaddan/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

Two western grey kangaroos were fighting and one missed kicking the other in the stomach.

Nicolas de Vaulx "How Do You Get That Damn Window Open" (Raccoon, France)

©Nicolas de Vaulx/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

This raccoon spends its time trying to get into houses out of curiosity and perhaps to steal food.

Pal Marchhart "Peek-a-Boo" (Brown Bear, Harghita Mountains, Romania)

©Pal Marchhart/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

A young bear descending from a tree looks like it's playing hide and seek.

Ronald Kranitz "I Got You" (Spermophile, Hungary)

©Ronald Kranitz /Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

I spent my days in my usual "gopher place" and yet again, these funny little animals haven't belied their true nature.

Video Category Winner Rahul Lakhmani "Hugging Your Best Friend After Lockdown"

©Rahul Lakhmani/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

From Your Site Articles
Related Articles Around the Web
Health

A child’s mental health concerns shouldn’t be publicized no matter who their parents are

Even politicians' children deserve privacy during a mental health crisis.

A child's mental health concerns shouldn't be publicized.

Editor's Note: If you are having thoughts about taking your own life, or know of anyone who is in need of help, the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline is a United States-based suicide prevention network of over 200+ crisis centers that provides 24/7 service via a toll-free hotline with the number 9-8-8. It is available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress.


It's an unspoken rule that children of politicians should be off limits when it comes to public figure status. Kids deserve the ability to simply be kids without the media picking them apart. We saw this during Obama's presidency when people from both ends of the political spectrum come out to defend Malia and Sasha Obama's privacy and again when a reporter made a remark about Barron Trump.

This is even more important when we are talking about a child's mental health, so seeing detailed reports about Ted Cruz's 14-year-old child's private mental health crisis was offputting, to say it kindly. It feels icky for me to even put the senator's name in this article because it feels like adding to this child's exposure.

When a child is struggling with mental health concerns, the instinct should be to cocoon them in safety, not to highlight the details or speculate on the cause. Ever since the news broke about this child's mental health, social media has been abuzz, mostly attacking the parents and speculating if the child is a member of the LGBTQ community.

Keep ReadingShow less

Famous writers shared their book signing woes with a disheartened new author.

Putting creative work out into the world to be evaluated and judged is nerve-wracking enough as it is. Having to market your work, especially if you're not particularly extroverted or sales-minded, is even worse.

So when you're a newly published author holding a book signing and only two of the dozens of people who RSVP'd show up, it's disheartening if not devastating. No matter how much you tell yourself "people are just busy," it feels like a rejection of you and your work.

Debut novelist Chelsea Banning recently experienced this scenario firsthand, and her sharing it led to an amazing deluge of support and solidarity—not only from other aspiring authors, but from some of the top names in the writing business.

Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 04.15.19


On May 28, 2014, 13-year-old Athena Orchard of Leicester, England, died of bone cancer. The disease began as a tumor in her head and eventually spread to her spine and left shoulder. After her passing, Athena's parents and six siblings were completely devastated. In the days following her death, her father, Dean, had the difficult task of going through her belongings. But the spirits of the entire Orchard family got a huge boost when he uncovered a secret message written by Athena on the backside of a full-length mirror.

Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 01.22.19


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn't have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women's rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn't something we'd choose—and we'd hope others wouldn't choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

Keep ReadingShow less