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funny animal photos, comedy wildlife, wildlife photography

Comedy Wildlife Award Winners 2021.

Six years ago, the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards started humbly as a small photo contest. But it's grown to be a worldwide renowned competition seen by millions across the globe. The photos are always funny but they come with a serious message: We need to protect the natural world.

This year's winner is "Ouch!" a photo of a Golden Silk Monkey who appears to have injured the family jewels by landing on a wire with his legs open. The photo was taken by Ken Jensen in 2016.

"I was absolutely overwhelmed to learn that my entry had won, especially when there were quite a number of wonderful photos entered," Jensen said in a statement. "The publicity that my image has received over the last few months has been incredible, it is such a great feeling to know that one's image is making people smile globally as well as helping to support some fantastically worthwhile conservation causes."


Winner: Ken Jensen "Ouch!" (Golden Silk Monkey, China)

Golden Silk Monkey, China.

©Ken Jensen/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

This is actually a show of aggression, however in the position that the monkey is in it looks quite painful!

Affinity People's Choice Winner: John Spiers "I Guess Summer's Over" (Pigeon, Oban, Argyll, Scotland)

©John Spiers/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

"I was taking pics of pigeons in flight when this leaf landed on the bird's face." – John Spiers

Creatures of the Land Winner: Arthur Trevino "Ninja Prairie Dog" (Bald Eagle, Longmont, U.S.A.)

©ArthurTrevino/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

When this Bald Eagle missed its attempt to grab this prairie dog, it jumped toward the eagle and startled it long enough to escape to a nearby burrow. A real David vs. Goliath story!

Creatures Under Water Winner: Chee Kee Teo "Time for School" (Smooth-Coated Otter, Singapore)

©Chee Kee Teo/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

A smooth-coated otter "bit" its baby otter to bring it back for a swimming lesson.

Portfolio: Vicki Jauron "Joy of Mud Bath" (Elephant, Matusadona Park, Zimbabwe)

©Vicki Jauron/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

An elephant expresses its joy in taking a mud bath against the dead trees on the shores of Lake Kariba in Zimbabwe on a hot afternoon.

Highliy Commended Winners: Andy Parkinson "Let's Dance" (Brown Bear Cubs, Kamchatka Peninsula, Far East Russia)

©Andy Parkinson/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

Two Kamchatka bear cubs square up for a celebratory play fight having successfully navigated a raging torrent (small stream!).

Chu Han Lin "See Who Jumps High" (Mudskipper, Taiwan)

©Chu Han Lin/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

I have the high ground!

David Eppley "The Majestic and the Graceful Bald Eagle" (Bald Eagle, Florida, U.S.A.)

©David Eppley/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

Bald eagles will use the same nest for years, even decades, adding new material to it at the beginning and throughout the nesting season. Normally, they are highly skilled at snapping branches off trees while in flight. Possibly tired from working nonstop all morning on a new nest, this particular bald eagle wasn't showing its best form.

Yes, sometimes they miss. Although this looks painful, and it might very well be, the eagle recovered with just a few sweeping wing strokes, and chose to rest a bit before making another lumber run.

Gurumoorthy K "The Green Stylist" (Indian Chameleon, Western Ghats)

©Gurumoorthy K/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

Just who do you think you're looking at?

Jakub Hodáñ "Treehugger" (Proboscis Monkey, Borneo)

©Jakub Hodáñ/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

This proboscis monkey could be just scratching its nose on the rough bark, or it could be kissing it. Trees play a big role in the lives of monkeys. Who are we to judge?

Jan Piecha "Chinese Whispers" (Raccoon, Kassel, Germany)

©Jan Piecha/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

The little raccoon cubs are telling secrets to each other.

Lea Scaddan "Missed" (Kangaroo, Perth, Australia)

©Lea Scaddan/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

Two western grey kangaroos were fighting and one missed kicking the other in the stomach.

Nicolas de Vaulx "How Do You Get That Damn Window Open" (Raccoon, France)

©Nicolas de Vaulx/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

This raccoon spends its time trying to get into houses out of curiosity and perhaps to steal food.

Pal Marchhart "Peek-a-Boo" (Brown Bear, Harghita Mountains, Romania)

©Pal Marchhart/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

A young bear descending from a tree looks like it's playing hide and seek.

Ronald Kranitz "I Got You" (Spermophile, Hungary)

©Ronald Kranitz /Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

I spent my days in my usual "gopher place" and yet again, these funny little animals haven't belied their true nature.

Video Category Winner Rahul Lakhmani "Hugging Your Best Friend After Lockdown"

©Rahul Lakhmani/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021.

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