7 reasons why the Trubama bromance is as amazing as it looks.

How do you know when you've found your best bro?

You know, that special someone who truly makes your chill sessions complete? That bro who you don't even have to invite to anything because, obviously, dude, he'll be there.

The ancient rituals and traditions of dude-dude bonding are not only steeped in storied history, they're important. They're even healthy, according to science.


So how do you to know when you've found the Sam to your Frodo? The Finn to your Poe Dameron? The Ian McKellen to your Patrick Stewart? The Walt to your Jesse?

GIF via Television Academy/YouTube.

Or even ... dare I say ... the Trudeau to your Obama?

After pics of President Barack Obama palling around with newly elected Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during his first official visit to The White House began surfacing online, the Internet fell in love with the way the two heads of state just seemed to click.

Here are the seven undeniable signs you've found your best bro, as demonstrated by "Trubama":

1. You both support the welcoming of Syrian refugees.

Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.

A good sign you've found your bro-4-lyfe is that you both want to welcome Syrian refugees into your country. And sure, it's going to be an uphill battle for you in Congress, and you may have to make strong pleas to the country to shift public opinion, but it's about being on the right side of history, bro. You both understand that, and that's the making of a true bromance.

2. You're both super into the scientific consensus on climate change.

Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.

Climate change is decidedly not dope. But you know what is? The scientific consensus that yes, it's a real thing. If you and your bro have acknowledged that and have made active steps to combat it through powerful initiatives, well, you may have just found yourself a best bro.

3. You can put your differences on the Keystone pipeline behind you and still bro-out.

Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.

Sure, you think the Keystone pipeline is a regressive action that would create a small number of jobs and "undercut" America's leadership when it comes to taking serious action to fight climate change, and he supports it, but if you can put that all behind you and just chill together, that's a damn good bro.

4. You both want mad health care for everyone.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

You love health care so much that your last name is now semipermanently attached to the word "care." You love it so much that healthcare reform will surely go down in history as one of your biggest and most lasting accomplishments. If he does too, that's a solid bro.

5. You both think marijuana laws should be way less mega-harsh.


Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

Hey, he might even support the legalization of marijuana. You can't quite go that far, but you both can agree that locking up kids and individual users for long stretches of time is too harsh a punishment for the stuff. That's the kind of bro-greement that only best bros can come to.

6. You both want to invest in infrastructure.

Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

Both of you know you can't have crumbling highways and out-of-date bridges AND have people unemployed. That's just lame. So that's why you passed a $305 billion spending bill in 2015. Look into your bros eyes. If you see that he also wants to boost government spending to support public transit infrastructure, social infrastructure, and even green infrastructure, then that's a true bro.

7. You both want to raise taxes on the wealthy.

Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.

You're two of the most powerful people in the world. But even you can clearly see that the income gap has gotten a little ridiculous. That's why you proposed a budget in 2015 with tax hikes on the wealthiest citizens, and your bro openly supports a tax hike on the rich. In fact both of you know that it's not class warfare. it's about paying your fair share. That's pretty chill.

If you and your bro share any of these beliefs, you may have found a best bro.

So raise up your glass...

Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images.

And lets all toast to the besties in our life. The number 1 bro's. The got-your-back-no-matter-what bros.

Even if you have bros already, bro, you should probably get some more. There are endless hockey games to attend, video games to play, craft beers to drink, and Magic: The Gathering tournaments to win, and there's no one better to do those things with than with your best bros.

They complete us. They make us stronger. They lift us when we're down. And lets face it.

You look damn good together.

Photo by Jim Lo Scalzo-Pool/Getty Images.

Canva

As millions of Americans have raced to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, millions of others have held back. Vaccine hesitancy is nothing new, of course, especially with new vaccines, but the information people use to weigh their decisions matters greatly. When choices based on flat-out wrong information can literally kill people, it's vital that we fight disinformation every which way we can.

Researchers at the Center for Countering Digital Hate, a not-for-profit non-governmental organization dedicated to disrupting online hate and misinformation, and the group Anti-Vax Watch performed an analysis of social media posts that included false claims about the COVID-19 vaccines between February 1 and March 16, 2021. Of the disinformation content posted or shared more than 800,000 times, nearly two-thirds could be traced back to just 12 individuals. On Facebook alone, 73% of the false vaccine claims originated from those 12 people.

Dubbed the "Disinformation Dozen," these 12 anti-vaxxers have an outsized influence on social media. According to the CCDH, anti-vaccine accounts have a reach of more than 59 million people. And most of them have been spreading disinformation with impunity.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

Keep Reading Show less