13 emotional tweets that nail what Hillary Clinton's big win means to our daughters.

Hillary Clinton has made history by becoming the first woman to effectively clinch the nomination of a major American political party.

Photo by Justin Sullivan.


Though the nomination won't officially be decided until the Democratic National Convention convenes in July, recent wins in California, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota, gave the former secretary of state a certain majority of pledged delegates and assured her a wide popular vote victory in the Democratic primary.

The night was especially meaningful for one group: parents with daughters.

Hillary Clinton greets a woman and her daughter in California. Photo by Irfan Khan/Getty Images.

1. For many, the significance of watching a woman on stage kicking off her presidential campaign was monumental.


2. Some parents were thrilled their daughters got the message without their help.


3. Others hoped Clinton's victory meant their children might inhabit a better world in the future.


4. For some, bedtimes were ignored.


5. For others, not so much.


6. And while it was a tough night for non-Clinton supporters, many set aside their own disappointment to make sure their daughters witnessed history.


7. And many also granted some all-important bedtime flexibility to do so.


8. For some, Clinton's example is already having an effect.


9. And even better, others expressed the confidence that, for their younger daughters, a woman leading a presidential ticket will always be normal.


10. Some saw Clinton's victory as one step in a much larger — and longer — fight for equality.


11. Other parents recognized that their daughters weren't the only ones who should be paying attention.


12. The moment was especially bittersweet for one daughter, whose mom couldn't be there to witness it.


13. But she graciously shared the moment with others.


Though it took 240 years, watching the first woman campaign for the highest office on a major party ticket is a very big deal — not just for parents with daughters, but for all Americans.

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

For those who support her, and those who don't.

Let's make sure she's not the last.

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.


Photo courtesy of Justin Sather
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Photo courtesy of Justin Sather

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