An 11-year-old girl is taking sewing lessons to make 1,200 masks for homeless people

In the midst of a global pandemic, plenty of the rich and powerful are coming out of the woodwork to use their resources to help those in need. Perhaps the most inspiring story, though, is that of Holli Morgan, an 11-year-old from DeKalb County, Atlanta. When Holli was worried about homeless people staying safe from the virus, she decided to make masks for them. She's already made hundreds of masks, and she plans to make hundreds more.

At first, Holli made masks for healthcare workers. That is, until she saw a report on Channel 2 News about mandatory mask laws, and she asked her mother how these rules would apply to homeless people. She became inspired to help, and, eventually, Holli's efforts became so large that she and her mother were interviewed on Channel 2 News itself. "She's a little girl who wanted to be part of something big," said Holli's mother in the interview. "None of us really knew how big it would go."



The pastor of Holli's church, Dr. Kerwin Lee, has called Holli a "blessing to others," and has taken it upon himself to distribute Holli's masks to those who need them — and he should be pretty helpful, as he has congregations in three local counties. "Throughout our 25-year history, we've seen God use many young people to make a difference," he said. "Holli is making a difference during a season of pandemic."

In a WSB-TV article on July 10, 2020, Holli is quoted as saying, "I have 574 masks in total. My goal is 1,200 masks." Then, in an ABC7-NY article on July 12, 2020, Holli is listed as having sewn 580 masks. This puts Holli solidly at six new masks in two days, or a rate of plus three masks per day. At this pace, Holli will reach her goal of 1,200 masks by Saturday, March 5, 2022, assuming she takes Sundays off. Keep going, Holli!

Holli's mother said "ever since [Holli] was born, she's always had this big heart." Likewise, Dr. Lee emphasized, "It's her own initiative. It wasn't something that someone planted in her. She saw there was a need, and knew she was gifted to do this." It's amazing to hear adults singing Holli's praises and give her credit for her hard work — however, Holli remains brave and humble, simply saying of the matter, "It makes me feel like I did something to help the Earth."

It's hard work to be there for yourself and your loved ones during a pandemic, and to do so for strangers is an even harder, nobler endeavor. Plenty of children are spending their newfound free time playing video games or watching TikToks — and there's nothing wrong with that, but sewing classes are cheap, and people are dying.

Courtesy of Verizon
True

If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via @Todd_Spence / Twitter

Seven years ago, Bill Murray shared a powerful story about the importance of art. The revelation came during a discussion at the National Gallery in London for the release of 2014's "The Monuments Men." The film is about a troop of soldiers on a mission to recover art stolen by the Nazis.

After his first time performing on stage in Chicago, Murray was so upset with himself that he contemplated taking his own life.

"I wasn't very good, and I remember my first experience, I was so bad I just walked out — out onto the street and just started walking," he said.

Keep Reading Show less