An 11-year-old girl is taking sewing lessons to make 1,200 masks for homeless people

In the midst of a global pandemic, plenty of the rich and powerful are coming out of the woodwork to use their resources to help those in need. Perhaps the most inspiring story, though, is that of Holli Morgan, an 11-year-old from DeKalb County, Atlanta. When Holli was worried about homeless people staying safe from the virus, she decided to make masks for them. She's already made hundreds of masks, and she plans to make hundreds more.

At first, Holli made masks for healthcare workers. That is, until she saw a report on Channel 2 News about mandatory mask laws, and she asked her mother how these rules would apply to homeless people. She became inspired to help, and, eventually, Holli's efforts became so large that she and her mother were interviewed on Channel 2 News itself. "She's a little girl who wanted to be part of something big," said Holli's mother in the interview. "None of us really knew how big it would go."



The pastor of Holli's church, Dr. Kerwin Lee, has called Holli a "blessing to others," and has taken it upon himself to distribute Holli's masks to those who need them — and he should be pretty helpful, as he has congregations in three local counties. "Throughout our 25-year history, we've seen God use many young people to make a difference," he said. "Holli is making a difference during a season of pandemic."

In a WSB-TV article on July 10, 2020, Holli is quoted as saying, "I have 574 masks in total. My goal is 1,200 masks." Then, in an ABC7-NY article on July 12, 2020, Holli is listed as having sewn 580 masks. This puts Holli solidly at six new masks in two days, or a rate of plus three masks per day. At this pace, Holli will reach her goal of 1,200 masks by Saturday, March 5, 2022, assuming she takes Sundays off. Keep going, Holli!

Holli's mother said "ever since [Holli] was born, she's always had this big heart." Likewise, Dr. Lee emphasized, "It's her own initiative. It wasn't something that someone planted in her. She saw there was a need, and knew she was gifted to do this." It's amazing to hear adults singing Holli's praises and give her credit for her hard work — however, Holli remains brave and humble, simply saying of the matter, "It makes me feel like I did something to help the Earth."

It's hard work to be there for yourself and your loved ones during a pandemic, and to do so for strangers is an even harder, nobler endeavor. Plenty of children are spending their newfound free time playing video games or watching TikToks — and there's nothing wrong with that, but sewing classes are cheap, and people are dying.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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According to People.com, Patti calls her sons home to Point Pleasant, New Jersey, every fall for a special Halloween photoshoot with Avery. And the results are nothing short of epic.

The Schmidt family started the tradition in 2017 with the boys dressing as the tinman, the scarecrow, and the cowardly lion from "The Wizard of Oz." Avery, just a toddler at the time, was dressed as Dorothy, complete with adorable little ruby slippers.

The following year, the boys were Luke Skywalker, Han Solo, and Chewbacca, and Avery was (of course) Princess Leia.

In 2019, they did a "Game of Thrones" theme. ("My husband and I were binge-watching (Game of Thrones), and I thought the boys as dragons would be so funny," Schmidt told TODAY.)

In 2020, they went as Princess Buttercup, Westley, Inigo Montoya, and Fezzik from "The Princess Bride."

Patti shared a video montage of each year's costume shoot—with accompanying soundtracks—on Instagram and TikTok. Watch:

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Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."