+
lost dogs, erica hart, drones

Erica Hart finds lost dogs with drones.

A woman in South Yorkshire, England, has had an incredible impact on hundreds of people's lives by using her skills as a drone pilot to find lost dogs. Erica Hart, 40, told the BBC that over the past seven years she has “easily” reunited at least 200 lost dogs with their families.

It all started when she was playing with her new drone near a wooded area and a man told her he'd lost his dog. Hart located the pooch within 15 minutes. "It just went from there basically,” she told the BBC. “It’s like winning the lottery, it's absolutely priceless."

"When I first found that first dog and seeing that expression on his face because he'd been missing nearly four days, it was just a thing that, yeah, I can do something and I can make myself useful and be a pillar to the community and help unite loved ones with their dogs,” she continued.

What’s truly incredible is that she doesn’t charge a penny for her services and rarely accepts any compensation unless the job required her to use a lot of gasoline. Given the fact she locates animals that are priceless to their families, she could easily charge hundreds or even thousands of dollars for her services.

“I go home some days and I've spent £50 ($57) out of my own pocket and I've gone without stuff for myself to put petrol in the car to find a dog,” she told the Daily Mail.



Her success in reuniting lost dogs with their families led her to create HARTSAR, a Facebook community where people can enlist her services to find their lost dogs.

When Hart goes searching for a lost dog it’s like a military exercise. Her drone is equipped with a thermal energy camera that makes a warm-blooded animal easily identifiable among its cooler surroundings. The drone gives her an incredible vantage point that makes it a lot easier to see a dog than by searching on the ground.

From there, she positions people on the ground to intercept the missing pet.

Recently, she helped find Jamie and Leah Hollinshed's black schnauzer Hilda in just 20 minutes after the couple had been trying to locate the dog for hours. Time was of the essence because a storm was on its way.

“What she did is brilliant. She's a hero, a real superhero,” Jamie told the Daily Mail. “We'd had a couple of hours with no sighting but she spotted her in 20 minutes. It just shows how good these drones can be, we were so relieved when she found her.”

Hart’s brilliant technique for finding lost pups has already helped hundreds of people, but her story may save countless more. This new technology should be used by law enforcement and rescue shelters across the world to reunite people with their lost fur babies.

If every town in the world had an Erica Hart with a drone, hardly anyone would lose a pet.

Hart's innovation is incredible, but for her, it’s all about the animals. “When I post it on Facebook and I see the comments I lay in bed with a smile on my face and realize why I do it,” she told the Daily Mail. “I do it for the love of the dogs.”

via Chewy

Adorable Dexter and his new chew toy. Thanks Chewy Claus.

True

Every holiday season, millions of kids send letters asking for everything from a new bike to a pony. Some even make altruistic requests such as peace on Earth or helping struggling families around the holidays.

But wouldn’t the holiday season be even more magical if our pets had their wishes granted, too? That’s why Chewy Claus is stepping up to spread holiday cheer to America’s pets.

Does your dog dream of a month’s supply of treats or chew toys? Would your cat love a new tree complete with a stylish condo? How about giving your betta fish some fresh decor that’ll really tie its tank together?

Or do your pets need something more than mere creature comforts such as life-saving surgery?

Keep ReadingShow less
Celebrity

U.S. Soccer star expertly handles an Iranian reporter’s loaded questions about race.

Tyler Adams’s response proves exactly why he’s the captain of the US soccer team.

Tyler Adams expertly handles Iranian reporter's question

Reporters are supposed to ask the right questions to get to the truth but sometimes it seems sports reporters ask questions to throw you off your game. There's no doubt that this Iranian reporter who was questioning Tyler Adams, the US soccer team captain at the press conference during the World Cup had an agenda that didn't involve getting to the truth.

It's not clear if the questions were designed to throw the young player off of his game or if the goal was embarrassment. It really is hard to tell, but Adams handled the unexpectedly harsh encounter with intelligence and poise when some may have found it justified for him to get angry.

Keep ReadingShow less

Things non-Americans just don't understand.

A recent viral Reddit thread revealed the everyday American customs that people in other countries have a difficult time understanding. There were so many things that were perplexing to people from other countries that the thread had more than 28,000 responses.

But don’t worry, it isn’t a long list of America bashing. It’s a fun list of things people across the world genuinely wonder about that gives a unique perspective on things we all take for granted.

The thread was started by Reddit user Surimimimi, who asked, “What things do Americans like and the rest of the world not so much?” Many of the responses were from Europeans who have a hard time appreciating certain American customs, cuisines and public facilities.

Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 07.22.21


As if a Canada goose named Arnold isn't endearing enough, his partner who came looking for him when he was injured is warming hearts and having us root for this sweet feathered couple.

Cape Wildlife Center in Barnstable, Massachusetts shared the story on its Facebook page, in what they called "a first" for their animal hospital.


Keep ReadingShow less
Identity

'Blind Poet' turned the loss of his vision into an opportunity to build a community on Facebook

At his most vulnerable moment, he found the gift of self-expression.

via Meta Community Voices

Dave Steele aka "The Blind Poet."

True

Dave Steele was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in 2014 and told that he would slowly lose his vision until he was completely blind. Imagine the pain and stress of knowing that every day your sense of sight will slowly diminish until you fall into darkness.

Steele was not only losing his sight, but after his diagnosis, he felt he lost his purpose.

The diagnosis came with an added gut punch: Each of his four children also has a 50% chance of having RP. Steele lost his job, his family couldn’t afford the rent on their home and the waiting list for government benefits was nine months. "I was feeling more guilty about the pressure I was putting on my family and that, in turn, was affecting my vision loss as well and I became more anxious and more isolated because of it,” he told Henshaws InSights.

As his troubles mounted, Steele found solace in talking to others coping with sight loss through Facebook community groups. “That was a real massive, massive help to me,” he told Henshaws InSights.

Keep ReadingShow less