What kind of president would Kamala Harris be? The way she stumped Brett Kavanaugh with a simple question about women's rights tells us a lot.

Donald Trump’s appointment of conservative justice Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court has many abortion-rights advocates fearful.

If Kavanaugh is confirmed, the Court will have a conservative majority and could overturn the protections guaranteed to women via the 1973 Roe V. Wade ruling.

On the first day of Kavanaugh’s senate hearing, he was evasive about whether he believes Roe V. Wade could be overturned, calling it “settled as a precedent of the Supreme Court entitled the respect under principles of stare decisis.”


He has also referred to Roe V. Wade as the “law of the land.” Which sounds powerful, but it's a toothless statement. All current laws can be overturned.

On day two, Kavanaugh faced his toughest challenge on the abortion issue from California Democratic Senator Kamala Harris.

In a tense back-and-forth she showed her experience as a district attorney and prosecutor by backing the justice into a corner.

On the second-to-last question of the night, Harris asked Kavanaugh if he can think of any laws “that give the government the power to make decisions about the male body?”

The entire room sat in silence for three seconds, before Kavanaugh replied: “Um … I’m happy to answer a more specific question, but …”

“Male versus female?” Harris responded.

Kavanaugh fumbled around asking about “medical procedures” before Harris succinctly asked the question again: “Can you think of any laws that give the government the power to make decisions about the male body?

“I’m not aware of any right now, Senator,” Kavanaugh responded in defeat.

Kavanaugh’s reponse shows he completely understands that overturning Roe V. Wade returns a woman’s power over her body to the will of the government. His caginess shows he’s far from strident in his belief that this fundamental right should be preserved.

The next day, on September 6, confidential documents leaked by Democratic Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey show Kavanaugh may not truly believe Roe V. Wade to be “settled as a precedent.”

Kavanaugh challenged the accuracy of deeming the Supreme Court’s landmark decision to be settled.

In 2003, as a White House lawyer in the Bush administration letter he wrote a letter saying: “I am not sure that all legal scholars refer to Roe as the settled law of the land at the Supreme Court level since Court can always overrule its precedent, and three current Justices on the Court would do so.”

Your turn, Mrs. Harris.

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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Public education is one of the most complex issues under normal circumstances, but the pandemic has made it far more complicated. The question of how to meet the needs of kids who come from diverse families, communities, and socioeconomic circumstances—not to mention having diverse mental strengths, interests, and challenges of their own—is never simple, and adding the difficulty of living through a pandemic with its lack of certainty, structure, and security is a whole freaking lot.

Kids' individual experiences during the pandemic have varied greatly. While the overall situation has been hard for everyone, some kids have actually thrived at home, away from the rigid schedules and social quagmire of traditional school. Other kids have floundered without the routine and personal interaction, while still others are stuck in terrible home situations or have needs that can't be met by parents alone. Some kids are being greatly harmed by missing school.

Educators, politicians, public health officials, and parents have gone around and around for the past year trying to figure out what smart, what's safe, what's necessary, and what's not for kids during COVID-19. Many of us are worried about the mental health and educational struggles children are facing. There are no easy answers. There is no one-size-fits-all solution.

However, there is an attitude that we can take that will serve all our children as more kids move back to the classroom. A 40-year veteran of our education system, former New York teacher and administrator Therea Thayer Snyder, wrote a letter on Facebook that has resonated with teachers and parents alike. In it, she describes what our kids have experienced during the pandemic, how academic standards and measures no longer apply, and what schools can do to help kids process what they've been through. It reads:

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Courtesy of Benjamin Faust via Unsplash
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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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This morning, Joe and Jill Biden went out for a walk with their dogs, Champ and Major, to check out the surprise the first lady had installed overnight for Valentine's Day weekend. The White House lawn has been decorated with oversized hearts that have positive words like LOVE, GRATITUDE, COMPASSION, and FAMILY on them. The one that says HEALING is signed "Love, Jill."

As they walked along with coffee cups in hand, the first couple was met by a few members of the press. The conversation that they had has gone viral—not so much because of how extraordinary it was, but rather the opposite. It was delightfully ordinary, filled with normalcy, decency, and even a random act of kindness for good measure. And the simple goodness of it all is moving people to tears.

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Sergi Cardenas/Instagram

Optical illusions are always fun to play with, and the paintings of Sergi Cadenas are no exception.

If you walk up to one of Cadenas's portraits from one direction, you'll see a face. If you walk up to it from the opposite direction, you'll also see a face—but a totally different one. Sometimes it's a young face that ages as you walk from one side to another, like this one:

Or this one:

Sometimes it's a face that has the...um...face part removed.

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