Heroes

What happens when a supermodel learns how to code? She passes it on.

Supermodel Karlie Kloss is tackling a new field: coding. And now that she has a year of classes under her belt, she wants to pass along the learnings.

What happens when a supermodel learns how to code? She passes it on.

Meet supermodel Karlie Kloss.

Karlie's a supermodel, ballerina, and self-proclaimed "cookie expert." If you don't know Karlie by name, you've probably seen her walking the Victoria's Secret runway or hanging out with her bestie Taylor Swift. But now she's tackling a whole different field, the world of code.


After falling in love with code, Karlie wanted to help young women discover this incredible tool.

Like most creative people, Karlie wasn't satisfied with just having a few skills under her belt. After taking classes in code, she was pleasantly surprised to learn how fun, challenging, and rewarding this technical language could be. That's why in April 2015, she partnered with the Flatiron School for #KodeWithKarlie, which will provide summer coding scholarships to girls across the country.

"I think it's crucial that young women learn to code as early as possible. To ensure that we as young women have a voice and a stake in what the world looks like." — Karlie Kloss

Why's it so important for girls to learn how to code?

Too often, young girls are discouraged from taking an interest in science, tech, electronics, and math, commonly referred to STEM. Whether it happens at home, in the classroom or more discreetly through gendered toys and books, boys are often encouraged to pursue science and technology while girls are stuck with pink-washed toys and gender stereotypes. The result? STEM industries are largely male-dominated, thus widening the gender pay gap.

"In a country in which the average women still earns 77 cents for every dollar that a man earns, and in a country in which the majority of single parents are single mothers, getting more women into STEM could both reduce the gender wage gap and ensure that single mothers don't have to struggle to put food on the table. Not only are there currently more jobs in STEM than in any other industry, but most of these high-tech jobs are high-paying, as well." — "Closing the STEM Gender Gap: Why Is It Important and What Can You Do to Help?"

Technology is a huge part of today's world. From mobile phones, video games and computer software, code is part of our daily lives, and it isn't going anywhere anytime soon. The more young women are exposed to coding at a young age, the more who are likely to go into technology in the future. There's no denying technology has come a long way in recent years, but it can only stand to go further with as many new and diverse voices as possible.

Know a high school girl who'd like to learn to code? Check out the #KodeWithKarlie scholarship video and apply by May 1, 2015!

Can't apply for #KodeWithKarlie? There are more programs out there!

Full disclosure: This is not a sponsored post. I just love the idea of young women getting interested in technology. I was fortunate enough to spend a summer at computer camp when I was in middle school where I learned how to write HTML, C++, and even code my own video game. To this day, I credit that camp with sparking my interest in technology, which is a huge part of my career. So, if you can't apply for the #KodeWithKarlie scholarship, (maybe you've missed the deadline or it's not available in your city) don't fret; there are a bunch of programs available for aspiring female coders like Girls Who Code, Made With Code, and Black Girls Code.

Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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Canva

As millions of Americans have raced to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, millions of others have held back. Vaccine hesitancy is nothing new, of course, especially with new vaccines, but the information people use to weigh their decisions matters greatly. When choices based on flat-out wrong information can literally kill people, it's vital that we fight disinformation every which way we can.

Researchers at the Center for Countering Digital Hate, a not-for-profit non-governmental organization dedicated to disrupting online hate and misinformation, and the group Anti-Vax Watch performed an analysis of social media posts that included false claims about the COVID-19 vaccines between February 1 and March 16, 2021. Of the disinformation content posted or shared more than 800,000 times, nearly two-thirds could be traced back to just 12 individuals. On Facebook alone, 73% of the false vaccine claims originated from those 12 people.

Dubbed the "Disinformation Dozen," these 12 anti-vaxxers have an outsized influence on social media. According to the CCDH, anti-vaccine accounts have a reach of more than 59 million people. And most of them have been spreading disinformation with impunity.

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Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

Keep Reading Show less