Heroes

What happens when a supermodel learns how to code? She passes it on.

Supermodel Karlie Kloss is tackling a new field: coding. And now that she has a year of classes under her belt, she wants to pass along the learnings.

Meet supermodel Karlie Kloss.

Karlie's a supermodel, ballerina, and self-proclaimed "cookie expert." If you don't know Karlie by name, you've probably seen her walking the Victoria's Secret runway or hanging out with her bestie Taylor Swift. But now she's tackling a whole different field, the world of code.


After falling in love with code, Karlie wanted to help young women discover this incredible tool.

Like most creative people, Karlie wasn't satisfied with just having a few skills under her belt. After taking classes in code, she was pleasantly surprised to learn how fun, challenging, and rewarding this technical language could be. That's why in April 2015, she partnered with the Flatiron School for #KodeWithKarlie, which will provide summer coding scholarships to girls across the country.

"I think it's crucial that young women learn to code as early as possible. To ensure that we as young women have a voice and a stake in what the world looks like." — Karlie Kloss

Why's it so important for girls to learn how to code?

Too often, young girls are discouraged from taking an interest in science, tech, electronics, and math, commonly referred to STEM. Whether it happens at home, in the classroom or more discreetly through gendered toys and books, boys are often encouraged to pursue science and technology while girls are stuck with pink-washed toys and gender stereotypes. The result? STEM industries are largely male-dominated, thus widening the gender pay gap.

"In a country in which the average women still earns 77 cents for every dollar that a man earns, and in a country in which the majority of single parents are single mothers, getting more women into STEM could both reduce the gender wage gap and ensure that single mothers don't have to struggle to put food on the table. Not only are there currently more jobs in STEM than in any other industry, but most of these high-tech jobs are high-paying, as well." — "Closing the STEM Gender Gap: Why Is It Important and What Can You Do to Help?"

Technology is a huge part of today's world. From mobile phones, video games and computer software, code is part of our daily lives, and it isn't going anywhere anytime soon. The more young women are exposed to coding at a young age, the more who are likely to go into technology in the future. There's no denying technology has come a long way in recent years, but it can only stand to go further with as many new and diverse voices as possible.

Know a high school girl who'd like to learn to code? Check out the #KodeWithKarlie scholarship video and apply by May 1, 2015!

Can't apply for #KodeWithKarlie? There are more programs out there!

Full disclosure: This is not a sponsored post. I just love the idea of young women getting interested in technology. I was fortunate enough to spend a summer at computer camp when I was in middle school where I learned how to write HTML, C++, and even code my own video game. To this day, I credit that camp with sparking my interest in technology, which is a huge part of my career. So, if you can't apply for the #KodeWithKarlie scholarship, (maybe you've missed the deadline or it's not available in your city) don't fret; there are a bunch of programs available for aspiring female coders like Girls Who Code, Made With Code, and Black Girls Code.

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