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The CDC reduced COVID isolation time and people are joking about the 'bad advice' that'll come next

The CDC reduced COVID isolation time and people are joking about the 'bad advice' that'll come next

The CDC changed its COVID-19 isolation guidelines on Monday in a move that confused a lot of people. The CDC now recommends that asymptomatic people infected with COVID-19 isolate for five days, instead of 10.

It also recommends that after isolation, those who were infected wear a mask for five days while around others.

The move comes at a time when there has been a major rise in cases across the country due to the omicron variant. The decision has a lot of people asking, “Why are we sending people who’ve been infected out in public sooner when the number of cases is on the rise?”

There has also been anxiety among the business community that an increase in isolated employees may lead to staffing shortages across the country. So is the CDC just bowing to the business community or is there a good reason for us to be more relaxed about a deadly disease?


“The Omicron variant is spreading quickly and has the potential to impact all facets of our society. CDC’s updated recommendations for isolation and quarantine balance what we know about the spread of the virus and the protection provided by vaccination and booster doses,” CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said in a statement.

“These updates ensure people can safely continue their daily lives,” she added. “Prevention is our best option: get vaccinated, get boosted, wear a mask in public indoor settings in areas of substantial and high community transmission, and take a test before you gather.”

There are a lot of people out there who think reducing isolation periods at a time when infections are on the rise is a really bad idea. So a group of people on Twitter decided to do the only thing we can in such crazy times, have a laugh.

The Twitter users have been speculating on other pieces of bad advice the CDC may come out with in the future. Here are 16 of the funniest.

No, don't get bangs.

People are a little suspicious that the CDC is kowtowing to business interests.

The worst piece of advice you'll ever get in high school.

Vizzini begs to differ.

You can eat the packet that says "DO NOT EAT" if your boss says it's ok.

No comment.

In 2022, Don Henley will become the CDC director.

The CDC pinky swears it will.

The CDC is so needy these days.

You can run with scissors, as long as you're wearing a mask.

No one can watch their dog stretch without making a comment. It's impossible.

The CDC only cares about your boss these days. Your health? Not so much.

What about ivermectin?

The CDC is now a dad in the '70s.

Vicks cures everything.

Clean toasters make healthy toast.

"Veteran" mom and "new" mom parent differently.

When a couple has their first child, they start out with the greatest of intentions and expectations. The child will only eat organic food. They will never watch TV or have screen time and will always stay clean.

But soon, reality sets in and if they have more kids, they'll probably be raised with a lot less attention. As a result, first-born kids turn out a bit differently than their younger siblings.

"Rules are a bit more rigid, attention and validation is directed and somewhat excessive," Niro Feliciano, LCSW, a psychotherapist and anxiety specialist, told Parents. "As a result, firstborns tend to be leaders, high achievers, people-pleasing, rule-following and conscientious, several of the qualities that tend to predict success."

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Mariah Carey performing at the Ziggo Dome in Amsterdam, Netherlands, June 2019 and Whitney Houston performing "Saving All My Love for You" during the HBO-televised concert "Welcome Home Heroes with Whitney Houston"

R&B music news site RNB Radar asked its audience on Twitter to share “an example of someone singing like the rent is due,” and they didn’t disappoint. The tweet thread of artists leaving it all out on the stage received over 30 million views because it was a fantastic way to experience some of the greatest R&B, soul and gospel singers giving their best performances.

To sing like the “rent is due” is to belt out the song like your life is on the line or that you’ll be living in the streets for the next few weeks if you don't give it your all. The artists that appeared most often on the list were Whitney Houston, Patti LaBelle and Christina Aguilera, who were all known to give it their all every time out.

Here are 11 of the best videos shared on Twitter in response to RNB Radar’s request.

Christina Aguilera’s rendition of James Brown’s “It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World” at the Grammys in 2007 goes next level when she hits that high note at the 18-second mark.

​The Lord definitely took notice of Karen Clark Sheard's show-stopping rendition of “Balm in Gilead.”

D’Atra Hicks used every emotion one woman can muster in this passionate performance of “How Much Can One Heart Take?” from the stage presentation of “Madea’s Family Reunion.”

Shoshana Bean’s stirring performance of “Make it Rain” is enough to make the sky open and pour down.

Whitney Houston left it all out on stage every time. This compilation proves it.

In one of the best battles in “The Voice” history, Trevin Hunte and Amanda Brown went toe to toe on Mariah Carey’s “Vision of Love.”

Once again, Whitney Houston, this time performing one of the most popular renditions of “The Star Spangled Banner,” a live version recorded at the Super Bowl in 1991. “If you were there, you could feel the intensity,” Houston said, according to Today.com. “We were in the Gulf War at the time. It was an intense time for our country. A lot of our daughters and sons were overseas fighting. I could see in the stadium, I could see the fear, the hope, the intensity, the prayers going up.”

How does Carrie Underwood not pass out when hitting the big note on “Broken Wing”?

Singing a duet with Mariah Carey is no easy task. But Wanya Morris from Boyz II Men is totally up for it in this performance of “One Sweet Day.”

Prince isn't singing here, but he gave every ounce of soul he had while playing The Beatles' "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" during the George Harrison tribute at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

Teddy Pendergrass’ passionate performance of “Turn Out the Lights” ensured the rent would get paid. Either he’d come up with the money or there’d be no shortage of women in the audience who would lend him a few bucks after setting this perfect thirst trap.

We get to see the world through Mr. Kitters' eyes.

Have you ever wondered what it's like to be a cat? To watch the world from less than a foot off the ground, seeing and hearing things humans completely miss, staring out the window for hours while contemplating one of your nine lives?

Well, thanks to one person, we need wonder no more—at least about what-they're-seeing part.

The TikTok channel Mr. Kitters the Cat (@mr.kitters.the.cat) gives us a cat's-eye view of the world with a camera attached to Mr. Kitters' collar. And the result is an utterly delightful POV experience that takes us through the daily adventuring of the frisky feline as he wanders the yard.

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Mom's videos show how her nonverbal son communicates.

Autism is a pretty broad spectrum and each autistic person is unique, with their own capabilities and limitations. There is no one-size-fits-all autism diagnosis or characteristics, so you may run into autistic people who are really bubbly and talkative, but you may also meet some who have limited or no vocabulary with more complex challenges.

Some people may believe that nonverbal autistic people either don't communicate or don't know how to communicate. One mom is challenging that perception with the videos she uploads to social media proving that using words isn't the only way someone can get their point across. Shae runs the TikTok account shae_n_stece where she shows the interactions she has with her nonverbal son, Ste'ce.

Shae gives her followers an inside look at how communication works without words. While she does plenty of talking herself, it's clear that Ste'ce's facial expressions are an equally valuable part of the conversation.

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Education

An attack outside a karaoke bar turned this simple furniture salesman into a mathematical genius

The tragic encounter gave Jason Padgett an extremely rare phenomenon known as "Acquired Savant Syndrome."

TEDx Talks/YouTube

Josh Padgett sharing his story on TEDx

Savant syndrome is an extremely rare condition in which a person diagnosed with a developmental disorder also displays extraordinary mental or artistic talent. Rarer still is Acquired Savant Syndrome, where a seemingly average person undergoes a traumatic brain injury and comes out with these otherworldly abilities.

Mathematical genius Jason Padgett is one of those cases. One of the first recorded cases, in fact.

Padgett was a furniture salesman, living a self-described “shallow” life chasing girls and parties, with zero interest in academics—least of all math, which he found “stupid.”

One fateful night in 2002 would change everything. Padgett was attacked just outside the karaoke bar he had visited, leaving him with a severe concussion. The day he woke up, he could see the world radically differently—everyday objects suddenly looked pixelated.

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Pop Culture

Andie MacDowell shows what we can all learn about beauty and age from the gray hair movement

"Honestly, it's exhausting to have to be something that you no longer are."

Andie MacDowell in Cannes, 2003.

For many, even those that proudly wave the flag of self-love, the sight of that first gray hair is anxiety inducing. That single strand is a harbinger of the doom of our youth. More than one, and you might as well weave them together to create yourself a noose. It’s time to kiss your beauty—and therefore, your value—goodbye.

But what if, instead of marking the end of our glory days, we could see this change as a new chapter with equally glorious reveals? Something worth presenting, rather than hiding?

Back in July 2021, actress Andie MacDowell made headlines for rocking the silver vixen look at the Cannes Film Festival. MacDowell’s hair has always been a defining feature, but previously she had been coloring her raven locks to maintain her signature look. This was at the behest of her managers, according to an interview with Vogue.

But after her kids officially declared the salt-and-pepper look was “badass,” MacDowell started to see going natural as a “power move.” So she followed the impulse, and you don’t need me to tell you it was a bit of a social media sensation.

MacDowell reflected on how freeing the experience was in a conversation with Interview Magazine. “I feel better like this. Honestly, it’s exhausting to have to be something that you no longer are…I was finally like, ‘You know what? I’m not young. And I’m OK with that..I feel so much more comfortable. It’s like I’ve taken a mask off or something.”’

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