+
upworthy

maurice sendak

Community

Why Maurice Sendak was delighted when a little boy ate the letter and drawing he sent him

Even the smallest original drawings from the "Where the Wild Things Are" author go for thousands of dollars at auction.

Clarence Patch/Wikimedia

Maurice Sendak published "Where the Wild Things Are" in 1963.

Maurice Sendak's "Where the Wild Things Are" is one of those timeless, classic children's books that holds a special place in the hearts of people of all ages. I read it so much as a child that I had it memorized when I read it to my own kids, and they will surely pass along the Wild Things love to the next generation as well.

Though "Where the Wild Things Are" is his most famous book, it's one of many that Sendak wrote and/or illustrated during his prolific career. We see his illustrative work in the "Little Bear" series, in "The Phantom Tollbooth," and dozens more—not too shabby for a largely self-taught artist.

Sendak's ability to tap into a child's imaginary world—both its light and dark places—was what made his work so beloved. But a story he shared of an interaction with a child in the real world demonstrates how well he understood his audience.

Keep ReadingShow less