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Sure looks like these monkeys are domesticating wild wolves. What's the deal?

Two enemies decided to stop fighting. The results speak for themselves.

Sure looks like these monkeys are domesticating wild wolves. What's the deal?

All right, we knew monkeys were smart. But this is just ridiculous.

Photos have surfaced recently of what looks like Ethiopian gelada monkeys domesticating wild wolves. Yeah — domesticating them, like dogs!

At least, that's what it looks like.


Wolves just out of frame doing cool wolf things. Photo by Alastair Rae/Wikimedia Commons.

According to an article over on New Scientist, researchers have observed the monkeys and wolves mingling peacefully over the course of several years.

While most carnivores in the area are known to actively hunt the monkeys, the geladas and the wolves have kind of just been ... ignoring each other.

Researcher Claudio Sillero adds that this is probably how the relationship between humans and dogs began thousands and thousands of years ago. Canines didn't become our best friends overnight. More likely, they hung around the fringes of our encampments, ate our scraps, and were tolerated as long as they didn't try to bite anyone.

Unfortunately, despite these similarities, don't expect monkeys to be keeping "pet wolves" anytime soon (as cool as that would be).

What does it actually mean to be domesticated?

You can generally think of domestication in terms of tameness. "Domesticated" is another way of describing an animal with a loss of aggression, and though we think of it as something humans "do" to other species, it actually exists all throughout nature.

Ants, for example, are masters of domestication. Bet you didn't know that!

This ant is going to TOWN on that aphid. Photo by Image by Dawidl/Wikimedia Commons.

It's part of what makes ants one of the world's most efficient predators.

Not a lot of people know that ants have this complex relationship with aphids (those tiny green bugs, sometimes known as "plant lice"). The aphids eat plants and produce a sticky, sweet substance called honeydew that the ants love.

Sometimes, ants will straight up eat aphids to get to the good stuff, but over time, they realized they could extract the honeydew by stroking the aphids on the back (without killing them).

So, ants keep colonies of aphids nearby and on-hand for whenever they need a snack, essentially "farming" them.

The aphids, in return, get protection from predators that DO want to eat them, like birds, which the ants will swarm and drive away during an attack.

Pretty cool, right?

And then there's this concept of self-domestication, which happens when a species self-selects away from aggression when it's beneficial for its survival.

Bonobos, for example, have evolved to become significantly less violent than their cousins, the chimpanzees.

Rather than fight each other for dominance and compete for resources, the bonobos' docile nature means they're able to cooperate, play, and form alliances (not to mention have recreational sex!).

Bonobos love to lend a helping hand. Photo by ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images.

So far, it's unclear exactly what's going on with the wolves and the gelada monkeys over in Ethiopia.

Whether there's purposeful domestication going on at the hands of the monkeys or the wolves are self-selecting away from eating the geladas remains to be seen.

We do know that the ceasefire between the two species seems to be working out for both parties.

The wolves are about 40% more successful in their rodent hunts when the monkeys are nearby, either because the monkeys help flush the rodents out or because they act as a false signal that there aren't any predators around.

And the monkeys? Well, they at least have one less carnivore to watch out for.

Image by 5540867 from Pixabay

Figuring out what to do for a mom on Mother's Day can be a tricky thing. There's the standard flowers or candy, of course, and taking her out to a nice brunch is a fairly universal winner. But what do moms really want?

Speaking from experience—my kids range from age 12 to 20—a lot depends on the stage of motherhood. What I wanted when my kids were little is different than what I want now, and I'm sure when my kids are grown and gone I'll want something different again.

We asked our readers to share what they want for Mother's Day, and while the answers were varied, there were some common themes that emerged.

Moms of young kids want a break.

When your kids are little, motherhood is relentless. Precious and adorable, yes. Wonderful and rewarding, absolutely. But it's a LOT. And it's a lot all the fricking time.

Most moms I know would love the gift of alone time, either away at a hotel or Airbnb or in their own home with no one else around. Time alone is a priceless commodity at this stage, especially if it comes with someone else taking care of cleaning, making sure the kids are fed and safe and occupied, doing the laundry, etc.

This is especially true after more than a year of pandemic living, where we moms have spent more time than usual at home with our offspring. While in some ways that's been great, again, it's a lot.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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