She was sexually assaulted, denied restitution and fined for protesting. Princeton students aren't having it.

Women's rights over their own bodies are currently being threatened by a rapidly growing number of states in America. Sadly, they're also not being protected as they should be by some of its most prestigious educational institutions.

Back in 2016, a young women at Princeton University who's chosen to remain anonymous was raped by a male student. Last year, she reported the incident and her assaulter to the school’s Title IX office — a facility designed to protect students from gender-based violence and harassment on campus — in hopes of getting some sort of justice. The school, however, concluded that the male student in question did not commit the act the young woman said he did, and she lost the case. She filed an appeal, but lost that too a month later.


Understandably upset and frustrated, the woman decided to protest the school's decision and the Title IX's office's lack of support by writing a few choice words on a few spots around campus with a marker.

While she did deface University property, the University handed down a punishment that many felt was far beyond what was appropriate, especially considering she's a sexual assault survivor. According to Huffington Post, she was ordered to perform 50 hours of community service and pay the school $2,722.58 for cleaning costs. She was also put on four years disciplinary probation.

A university spokesperson did note that Princeton fully supports any student's right to peacefully protest, but made this clarification:

“Let’s be clear: Students are not disciplined for participating in peaceful protests or speech ― students are subject to discipline if they deface and damage university property. The range of penalties imposed by the university in vandalism cases may include suspension or probation, campus service, and required restitution, with the amount tied directly to the cost of repairing the damage to university property.”

In response to the school's lack of care for the assaulted student, a barrage of student protestors took to the campus streets last week, and have been virtually camped out in front of Nassau Hall, where Princeton President Christopher Eisgruber's office resides, ever since.

PrincteonIXNow, which helped organize these protests, presented the President with a list of 11 demands detailing a desire for more support and transparency for students who come forward and report events of abuse or harassment to Title IX.

"We call for the reform of Princeton’s procedures regarding sexual and interpersonal violence. We ask for more. Princeton is—and can be—better than this," they wrote in their formal appeal to the University.

As of this writing, the students have been peacefully protesting for nine days. The University has met with the organizers, and made a statement in which they claim they will take steps to rectify the situation. Many students, however, have said they refuse to give up the fight until actual action is taken.

Every woman deserves the right to protect her body from harm, and seek justice if that right is taken away. It's way past time for that right to be upheld in every space in this country, but especially at an institution of higher learning.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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