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Pop Culture

Ryan Reynolds makes hilariously good case why Disney classics like 'Bambi' should be rated R

Fans chimed in with their own funny additions to re-thinking the Disney classics.

ryan reynolds, disney+, scary disney movies

Disney's "Bambi" (1942) and actor Ryan Reynolds.

Disney+ recently announced that it will add some R-rated movies to the streaming service for the first time, including "Deadpool," "Deadpool 2" and "Logan." Previously, the service only featured films rated PG-13 and below.

The site has also added some streaming shows intended for adult audiences such as "Daredevil," "The Punisher" and "Jessica Jones."

Ryan Reynolds, the star of “Deadpool,” announced the addition of the films on Twitter. But he also joked that some of Disney’s classic animated films that are rated G should earn an R rating for “irreversible trauma,” including “Snow White,” “Old Yeller,” “The Lion King,” and “Bambi.”


​He called out “Snow White” because he’s pretty sure the diamonds aren't "cruelty free" and for "borderline polyandry" between Snow White and the dwarves. "Old Yeller" deserves an R rating for the "ugly-cry inducing straight-up murder" of the titular dog. "Bambi" should be reconsidered for the “cold-blooded killing of an innocent deer mom." Finally, he says "The Lion King" should have a harder rating because of "fratricide" and "mauling."

A lot of people responded that they still haven’t gotten over the death of Bambi’s mother.

Others chimed in with Disney films they believe should be rated R for traumatizing them as children.

Reynolds could have easily added “Return to Oz” to the list of Disney films that caused “irreversible trauma” to children. Back in 1985, kids flocked to theaters to see what they thought was a sequel to “The Wizard of Oz” but what they got was a Dorothy forced into shock therapy because she can’t stop thinking of Oz.

When she gets back to Oz, the Emerald City is in shambles, her friends have been turned to stone and she gets chased by a freaky group of people called Wheelers.

To make things even worse she then gets kidnapped by a headless witch named Mombi. Mombi has a collection of heads that she wears depending on her mood.

Eventually, she has to confront an evil king made out of stone who threatens to turn Dorothy into a knick-knack.

While we're at it, Disney should also revisit its 1979 answer to “Star Wars,” “The Black Hole.” One would think that a Disney space opera would be a blast. But instead of being a swashbuckling adventure, it’s a haunted house film about a ghost ship run by zombies on the precipice of being sucked into a black hole.

The biggest name in the film is Anthony Perkins, best known as Norman Bates from the “Psycho” films. Not exactly Harrison Ford. But he dies pretty early after having his chest carved open with spinning blades by Maximillian, the bad guy’s evil henchman.

The film also boasts the first uses of the words “damn” and “hell” in a Disney film.

Spoiler alert: The film ends with everyone getting sucked into the black hole. The good guys wind up in a place that looks like heaven and the bad guys end up in a place that’s right out of “Dante’s Inferno.” Enjoy yourself, kids!

via Tod Perry

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