Ruth Bader Ginsburg is in Trump's head. And she has no plans of leaving.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg did not come to play.

Appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1993, the Supreme Court Justice has served on the highest court for nearly 25 years. Ginsburg was the second woman to be appointed to the court and has served with distinction, proving herself to be a outspoken advocate for workers rights, civil rights, gender equality, and the separation of church and state.

Fans (yes, justices can have super devoted fans) look up Ginsburg for her intelligence, rapier-wit, courage, strength, and even her fashion sense. (Dig her imitated but never duplicated dissent collar.) There are T-shirts, necklaces, dolls, and a coloring book in her honor.


As the kids say, she's a badass.

And at 84, while many of her peers have been retired for decades, Ginsburg shows no signs of slowing down.

Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

In fact, Ginsburg just revealed a subtle, yet pointed "Ginsburn" to the Trump administration.

Today, Ginsburg announced that she has hired law clerks through 2020, an indication she intends to remain firmly behind the bench through the end of President Donald Trump's first term.

Trump has long been a vocal critic of Ginsburg, even tweeting in 2016, "Her mind is shot — resign!" (It's probably no coincidence that just prior, Ginsburg called then candidate Trump a "faker" for not releasing his tax returns.)

Were she to heed Trump's advice, Ginsburg's retirement would free up another coveted lifetime seat on the Supreme Court, which the Trump administration would surely try to fill with someone more aligned with their political beliefs. In November, Trump even shared a list of conservative judges already in the running for his future Supreme Court picks.

But Ginsburg's move signals to Trump and anyone else in the wings, that she's not going anywhere.

Left: Photo by Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images. Right: Photo by Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images.

Not only is she sticking around, Ginsburg's voice is more important than ever.

A levelheaded jurist like Ginsburg provides a much-needed check on the Trump administration's pointed attacks on immigrants, civil rights, and some of the basic tenets of the constitution.

In it for the long haul, Ginsburg, a two-time cancer survivor, has been celebrated for keeping her body and mind in peak condition by working with a personal trainer, and insists she'll stay in the job as long as she's able.

However long the notorious RBG serves, she'll likely have generations of supporters cheering her on (and making Trump stew in the process).

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.