There's a Ruth Bader Ginsburg coloring book for those who want to color outside the lines.

When we heard about this new Ruth Bader Ginsburg coloring book, we were pretty pumped.

Yeah. That's right. A Ruth Bader Ginsburg coloring book. You didn't even know how much you wanted that to exist until I just said it, did you?

Whether the Supreme Court justice is advocating for an all-woman Supreme Court or dropping gay marriage truth bombs, she pretty much knocks it out of the park every chance she gets. Not to mention, we're big fans of adult coloring books here at Upworthy.


The good folks over at SheKnows had the Steve Jobs-esque foresight and initiative to create this brilliant RBG coloring book and unleash it upon the world.

"The coloring book is for all ages," says Jeanne Sager of SheKnows. "Whether it’s her grown-up fans or little kids who are just learning about some of the amazing women who help shape this country."

It's just as amazing as you'd think.

Images via SheKnows.com, used with permission.

The whole thing is available for download, so all you have to do is print it and let RBG inspire your ROYGBIV creativity.

As we printed out the pages and began coloring — because of course we did — we were reminded of just how much of a badass RBG is.

Here are just a few examples, from her long career of many, many more, of why she's such an iconic and beloved figure:

1. In 1961, RBG learned Swedish to write a book on Sweden's legal system.

That's right, way before Rosetta Stone, RBG sat down and learned Swedish to help research and write a book on Swedish law. Feel lazy yet? Check out the book here.

On this page, I had some fun with some bright neon colored pencils that were laying around my apartment. Check out that psychedelic Supreme Court in the background. Photo by Jon Comulada.

2. Did you know in 1972, RBG became the first tenured female professor at Columbia Law School?

While there, she co-founded the first law review on women’s issues called "Women’s Rights Law Reporter."

Senior Editor Rebecca Eisenberg nailed this tatted-up RBG portrait with the help of markers, pencils, and some sparkly gel pens. Photo by Rebecca Eisenberg.

3. On the subject of abortion rights, she once said: "The basic thing is that the government has no business making that choice for a woman."

And then she probably dropped a microphone. But seriously, RBG has been fighting tirelessly for a woman's right to choose ever since she first cracked open a law book.

Writer Erin Canty dreamed up this colorful RBG selfie. Photo by Erin Canty.

4. RBG also helped recognize the LGBTQ community as a constitutionally protected class in 1996.

That was a major first step in LGBTQ rights. Not to mention a huge victory for equality.

Ariel Azoff and her boyfriend, Gabe, took a break from Netflix and chilling to color these RBG tributes. The upper-lip mole is a nice touch. Photos by Ariel Azoff.

5. And in 2015, she helped legalize same-sex marriage. No biggy.

In one of the biggest landmark cases in Supreme Court history, RBG and four of her benchmates voted to make same-sex marriage the law of the land. Love wins. So does RBG.

Kelli Doré got the whole family involved in this very important project. Photos by Kelli Doré.

6. Did you know that in 2006, RBG helped the environment by voting to allow the Clean Water Act to apply to isolated wetlands?

She actually stopped land developers from building malls and condos on wetlands and marshes. She's basically the hero in an uplifting Disney movie.

4-year-old Finley is a huge RBG fan. Photos by Kelli Doré.

7. Oh, and let's not forget she's also a cancer survivor.

Yup. She had pancreatic cancer, which led to her getting surgery and receiving chemotherapy. She was sent home healthy in 2011, essentially telling cancer, "Excuse me, I have some work to do."

Daniel Christopher, who, by the way, is an amazing artist, made this RBG superhero with his daughter. "I was trying to explain to her who RBG is, [I said] she’s like a superhero but instead of fighting bad guys by punching, she fights them with words." Photos by Daniel Christopher.

8. Not to mention, RBG was the first female member of the Harvard Law Review.

And the second woman ever to be appointed to the Supreme Court!

Writer Heather Libby went above and beyond with this unicorn and Drake-style RBG picture. Photos by Heather Libby.

9. And she was the first Supreme Court justice to officiate at a same-sex marriage ceremony.

She's actually officiated a couple at this point. Including one where she attended the reception in a "glamorous jacket with a cream satin leaf motif." Because why not look good while you do good.

Photo by Kelli Doré.

Adding a bit of color to these pages was a lot of fun, but the best part was that we also got to celebrate one of our heroes.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg doesn't just inspire creativity.

"We realized the women who’ve inspired us the most are the women who’ve been brave enough to color outside the lines in their own lives," Jeanne Sager says about the creation of the coloring book.

Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images.

"Whether you agree with her views or not, Her Honor has always been an amazing role model and not just for women," Sager says. "This is a woman who was born just 13 years after women got the right to vote, and now she’s one of the justices on the highest court in the land."

So here's to you, Ruth Bader Ginsburg. You're an ironclad badass with the zeal and aplomb of history's greatest humans.

When they inevitably make a movie about you starring Meryl Streep, it'll have to be at least 19 hours long to capture how awesome you are at being awesome and, more importantly, never being afraid to color outside the lines.

Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

Photo courtesy of Kenneth and Jill Gonsalves
True

It can be expensive to have a pet. It's possible to spend between $250 to $700 a year on food for a dog and around $120-$500 on food for a cat. But of course, most of us don't think twice about the expense: having a pet is worth it because of the company animals provide.

But for some, this expense is hard to keep up, no matter how much you adore your fur baby. And that's why Kenneth and Jill Gonsalves decided to help.

Kenneth had seen a man scraping together change in a store to buy pet food, so he offered to buy the man some extra pet food. Still, later that night he couldn't stop thinking about the experience — he worried the man wasn't just struggling to pay for pet food, but food for himself, too.

So he went home and told his wife — and immediately, they both knew they needed to do something. So, in December 2020, they converted a farm stand into a take-what-you-need, leave-what-you-can Pet Food pantry.

"A lot of people would have watched that man count out change to buy pet food. Some may have helped him out like my husband did," Jill says. "A few may have thought about it afterward. But, only someone like Kenny would turn that experience into what we have today."

"If it weren't for his generous spirit and his penchant for a plan, the pantry would never have been born," she adds.

A man with sunglasses hands a box of cat food to a woman smiling Photo courtesy of Kenneth and Jill Gonsalves

At first, the couple started the pet food pantry with a couple hundred dollars of pet food they bought themselves. And to make sure people knew about the pantry, they set up a Facebook page for the pantry, then went to other Facebook groups, such as a "Buy Nothing group," and shared what they were doing.

"When we started, we weren't even sure people would use us," Jill says. "At best, we were hoping to be able to provide enough to help people get through the holidays."

But, thanks to their page and word of mouth, news spread about what they were doing, and the donations of more pet food started flooding in, too. Before long, they were coming home to stacks of food — and within a couple of months, the pantry was full.

Yellow post-it note with handwritten note that reads: "Hi, I read your story on Facebook. Here is a small donation to help. I have a 3-year-old yellow lab who I adore. I hope this helps someone in need. Merry Christmas. Meredith" Photo courtesy of Kenneth and Jill Gonsalves

"The pounds of food we have gone through is well, well, well into the thousands," Jill says. "The orders from our Amazon Wish List alone include several hundred pounds of dry food, a couple of hundred cases of canned food, and thousands of treats and toys. But, that does not even take into account the hundreds of drop-offs, online orders, and monetary donations we have received."

They also got many 'Thank you notes' from the people they helped.

"I would like to thank you for helping us feed our fur babies," one note read. "My husband and I recently lost our jobs, and my husband [will] hopefully [find] a new one. We are just waiting for a call."

Another read: "I just need to say thank you from the bottom of my heart. I haven't worked in over a month with a two-year-old at home. Dad brings in about $300/week. From the pandemic to Christmas, it has been tough. But with the help of beautiful people like you, my fur baby can now eat a little bit longer, and my heart is happy."

Jill says that she thinks the fact that the pet pantry is a farm stand helps people feel better.

A woman holding a small black dog and looking at the camera is greeted by Jill Gonsalves Photo courtesy of Kenneth and Jill Gonsalves

"When we first started this, someone who visited us mentioned how it made them feel good to be able to browse without feeling like they were being watched," she says. "So, it's been important to us to maintain that integrity."

Jill and Kenneth aren't sure how many people they've helped so far, but they know that their pet food pantry is doing what they hoped it would. "The pet owners who visit us, much like donations, come in ebbs and flows," Jill says. "We have some regulars who have been with us since the beginning. We also have some people that come a few times, and we never see again."

"Our hope is that they used us while they were in a tough spot, but they don't need us anymore. In a funny way, the greatest thing would be if no one needed us anymore."


Today, the Acushnet Pet Pantry is still going strong, but its stock is running low. If you want to help out, visit their Facebook page for updates and to find ways to donate.

This article originally appeared on 11.16.15


In the magazine aisle there's no shortage of suggestions to spice up your sex life with your partner.

They usually range from "duh" to ... absurd.

Keep Reading Show less
True

When Sue Hoppin was in college, she met the man she was going to marry. "I was attending the University of Denver, and he was at the Air Force Academy," she says. "My dad had also attended the University of Denver and warned me not to date those flyboys from the Springs."

"He didn't say anything about marrying one of them," she says. And so began her life as a military spouse.

The life brings some real advantages, like opportunities to live abroad — her family got to live all around the US, Japan, and Germany — but it also comes with some downsides, like having to put your spouse's career over your own goals.

"Though we choose to marry someone in the military, we had career goals before we got married, and those didn't just disappear."

Career aspirations become more difficult to achieve, and progress comes with lots of starts and stops. After experiencing these unique challenges firsthand, Sue founded an organization to help other military spouses in similar situations.

Sue had gotten a degree in international relations because she wanted to pursue a career in diplomacy, but for fourteen years she wasn't able to make any headway — not until they moved back to the DC area. "Eighteen months later, many rejections later, it became apparent that this was going to be more challenging than I could ever imagine," she says.

Eighteen months is halfway through a typical assignment, and by then, most spouses are looking for their next assignment. "If I couldn't find a job in my own 'hometown' with multiple degrees and a great network, this didn't bode well for other military spouses," she says.

She's not wrong. Military spouses spend most of their lives moving with their partners, which means they're often far from family and other support networks. When they do find a job, they often make less than their civilian counterparts — and they're more likely to experience underemployment or unemployment. In fact, on some deployments, spouses are not even allowed to work.

Before the pandemic, military spouse unemployment was 22%. Since the pandemic, it's expected to rise to 35%.

Sue eventually found a job working at a military-focused nonprofit, and it helped her get the experience she needed to create her own dedicated military spouse program. She wrote a book and started saving up enough money to start the National Military Spouse Network (NMSN), which she founded in 2010 as the first organization of its kind.

"I founded the NMSN to help professional military spouses develop flexible careers they could perform from any location."

"Over the years, the program has expanded to include a free digital magazine, professional development events, drafting annual White Papers and organizing national and local advocacy to address the issues of most concern to the professional military spouse community," she says.

Not only was NMSN's mission important to Sue on a personal level she also saw it as part of something bigger than herself.

"Gone are the days when families can thrive on one salary. Like everyone else, most military families rely on two salaries to make ends meet. If a military spouse wants or needs to work, they should be able to," she says.

"When less than one percent of our population serves in the military," she continues, "we need to be able to not only recruit the best and the brightest but also retain them."

"We lose out as a nation when service members leave the force because their spouse is unable to find employment. We see it as a national security issue."

"The NMSN team has worked tirelessly to jumpstart the discussion and keep the challenges affecting military spouses top of mind. We have elevated the conversation to Congress and the White House," she continues. "I'm so proud of the fact that corporations, the government, and the general public are increasingly interested in the issues affecting military spouses and recognizing the employment roadblocks they unfairly have faced."

"We have collectively made other people care, and in doing so, we elevated the issues of military spouse unemployment to a national and global level," she adds. "In the process, we've also empowered military spouses to advocate for themselves and our community so that military spouse employment issues can continue to remain at the forefront."

Not only has NMSN become a sought-after leader in the military spouse employment space, but Sue has also seen the career she dreamed of materializing for herself. She was recently invited to participate in the public re-launch of Joining Forces, a White House initiative supporting military and veteran families, with First Lady Dr. Jill Biden.

She has also had two of her recommendations for practical solutions introduced into legislation just this year. She was the first in the Air Force community to show leadership the power of social media to reach both their airmen and their military families.

That is why Sue is one of Tory Burch's "Empowered Women" this year. The $5,000 donation will be going to The Madeira School, a school that Sue herself attended when she was in high school because, she says, "the lessons I learned there as a student pretty much set the tone for my personal and professional life. It's so meaningful to know that the donation will go towards making a Madeira education more accessible to those who may not otherwise be able to afford it and providing them with a life-changing opportunity."

Most military children will move one to three times during high school so having a continuous four-year experience at one high school can be an important gift. After traveling for much of her formative years, Sue attended Madeira and found herself "in an environment that fostered confidence and empowerment. As young women, we were expected to have a voice and advocate not just for ourselves, but for those around us."

To learn more about Tory Burch and Upworthy's Empowered Women program visit https://www.toryburch.com/empoweredwomen/. Nominate an inspiring woman in your community today!