Protesters rushed to the airport this weekend but those at home made a big difference too.

Crowds of people rushing to airports over the weekend weren't in a hurry to catch flights — they were making a mad dash for democracy.

Protesters at New York's JFK airport show what they think of the executive order. Photo by Stephanie Keith/Getty Images.

In response to an executive order issued by President Trump that restricted travel from seven countries, thousands of people showed up at airports in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas-Fort Worth, Philadelphia, Boston, and other cities. They brought signs, demanded that those detained be let go, and cheered as people were released.


Not everyone was able to get to an airport, but that didn't stop them from getting involved from home.

While the American Civil Liberties Union was busy filing a suit against the Trump administration arguing the executive order was unconstitutional, hundred of thousands of people were putting their money where their Twitter retweets were by making online donations to support the organization.

People with slightly more money to donate, like singer/songwriter Sia, venture capitalist and occasional "Shark Tank" shark Chris Sacca, and producer/director Judd Apatow offered to match donations made to the ACLU up to a certain amount, allowing people to double the impact of their donations simply by tweeting proof of their contributions.

In one weekend, the ACLU received significantly more money than it usually does in one year.

As reported in USA Today on Sunday evening, the ACLU received more than 350,000 online donations totaling over $24 million since Saturday morning. The wave of online donations just goes to show that there are more ways to protest than showing up in a physical location and holding a kick-ass sign (although that certainly helps).

A protester at JFK holds a simple, kick-ass sign. Photo by Stephanie Keith/Getty Images.

In the past few weeks, millions have turned out at protests around the country, but the airport protests against the Muslim ban — and the ACLU successfully securing a temporary stay on it — were a good reminder that there are forms of protest available to people who can’t show up in person.

Your voice, your donation, and your presence matter. Don’t let anyone tell you that you’re not helping the cause if you can’t get to a physical location. Just do what you can with what you have, wherever you are.

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Number 10 / Flickr

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) approved a measure last month that could pave the way for the Catholic Church to deny President Joe Biden communion. The conservative bishops hope to prevent Biden from participating in the sacred ritual because of his support for abortion rights.

Biden is a devout Catholic who considered becoming a priest in his youth. He rarely misses mass, holds a rosary while making critical decisions, and often quotes scriptures. When asked about the bishops' decision Biden said it is "a private matter and I don't think that's going to happen."

The bishops hope the new guidance would push "Catholics who are cultural, political, or parochial leaders to witness the faith."

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