Gifts that Give Back: Shop the Upworthiest Place for Gifts & Giving

This year is different. Everything you feel, say, and do is different and matters like never before.

So, how about we let the good gifts roll?

Explore our brand new GOOD Market, a curated shop of goods that do good, and discover the perfect gifts for your quirky, picky, practical, eccentric, "don't know what to give them" family and friends.

On the giving side — every one of these is a gift that gives back. We believe in the power of your purchase, in sharing the best of humanity with the rest of the world, so every GOOD Market purchase supports local artisans and social causes around the world.

GOOD Market is a collaboration with NOVICA, one of the world's largest impact marketplaces for artists and artisans around the world. Here, you'll find gifts that fit the person, not just the holiday. You'll find something for every friend and family member – and great ways to celebrate a year where some days have been built around waiting for a delivery.

Here are a few suggestions for keeping this holiday season meaningful and memorable.

Gifts for those Home Not Alone aka "Family Gifts"

In a year of laughter and tears, it's time to find the perfect gift to express all they mean to you whether you're bound to them 24/7 or only sharing a screen.

GOOD Market's Artisan Gifts by global artisans range from the cool to the beautiful to the "you've got to be kidding me – posting this right now!" kind of gifts. They include jewelry and apparel, original one-of-kind artworks, archeological replicas, global decor, and countless other cultural treasures. This is the perfect place to get your loved ones gifts as special as they are.

Worry Wall Dancers (Guatemala)


Upworthy Merchandise

GOOD Market also offers a unique range of Upworthy Merch. The type of apparel that makes it easier to show everyone where you stand. This gear lets you broadcast your intention to stand up and not just stand by. Make a powerful statement with our ethically-sourced, made-in-the USA shirts and hoodies.

This Too Heather Red Unisex Sueded Jersey T-Shirt


Gifts for those Who Ain't Going Nowhere aka "The Kalamazoo to Kathmandu Blues"

Grab something from our GOOD for the Home Collection – it's perfect for bringing a touch of faraway dreaming to multi-purpose work and living spaces. From hand-tooled leather catch-alls to Peruvian ekekos and retablos there is something to quench the longing of everyone resigned to traveling sometime next year. Explore our GOOD Gift Suggestions

Handcrafted 3-Piece Shapivo Nativity Scene


Jewelry for All Seasons & Reasons

GOOD Market artisan jewelry does a whole lot of good. Our collection of traditional and contemporary designs, precious metals, and gemstones celebrate our commitment to doing and standing for what is right.

Hope and Peace Sterling Silver Stacking Ring Set


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Our favorite TikToker showed us that no matter what you're going through you will get through it. Shop this exclusive collaboration between @upworthy and the incomparable @TegaReacts and just Continue …


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Gifts Too Quirky for Words aka the "Different Drum" Guide

Beaded bandanas, rubber porcupine desk cups, and other never-imagineds live side by side in the GOOD Market. For those on your list that march to the beat of a different drum or just embrace the whimsical on the daily, this is your destination. You'll find everything from a rooster on a tortoise sculpture to hand-crocheted taco earrings. Let the fun begin.

Dolphin-Themed Mahogany Mini Djeme Drum from Bali


Gifts for Keeping it Cozy

The look of quarantine season is cozy and lounging at home — from scarves to sweaters or cushions to throws, our collection of handknit and handwoven GOOD Market Clothing is soft, stylish and oh-so-comfortable.


Alpaca Striped Kimono Ruana in Orange


Stocking Stuffers

Face masks have replaced the season's ubiquitous socks and you'll find hundreds of GOOD Face Masks perfect for gifting. This year tourism is down and many local markets have closed, forcing artisans around the world to make face masks to survive. Their amazing creations have allowed them to support their families, offer work to their neighbors, and keep global craft traditions alive all while helping the rest of us to mask up to stop the spread of COVID-19.

3 Colorful Nature Print 2-Layer Rayon Ear Loop Face Masks


It's time to find the good in everything - after all, that's what this season could really be about. Show someone you care for them and acknowledge the way they have cared for you. As the saying goes: it's the thought that counts. And GOOD Market is the perfect place to make thoughtful, conscious choices this holiday. Choose gifts that give back.

When "bobcat" trended on Twitter this week, no one anticipated the unreal series of events they were about to witness. The bizarre bobcat encounter was captured on a security cam video and...well...you just have to see it. (Read the following description if you want to be prepared, or skip down to the video if you want to be surprised. I promise, it's a wild ride either way.)

In a North Carolina neighborhood that looks like a present-day Pleasantville, a man carries a cup of coffee and a plate of brownies out to his car. "Good mornin!" he calls cheerfully to a neighbor jogging by. As he sets his coffee cup on the hood of the car, he says, "I need to wash my car." Well, shucks. His wife enters the camera frame on the other side of the car.

So far, it's just about the most classic modern Americana scene imaginable. And then...

A horrifying "rrrrawwwww!" Blood-curdling screaming. Running. Panic. The man abandons the brownies, races to his wife's side of the car, then emerges with an animal in his hands. He holds the creature up like Rafiki holding up Simba, then yells in its face, "Oh my god! It's a bobcat! Oh my god!"

Then he hucks the bobcat across the yard with all his might.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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