Gifts that Give Back: Shop the Upworthiest Place for Gifts & Giving

This year is different. Everything you feel, say, and do is different and matters like never before.

So, how about we let the good gifts roll?

Explore our brand new GOOD Market, a curated shop of goods that do good, and discover the perfect gifts for your quirky, picky, practical, eccentric, "don't know what to give them" family and friends.

On the giving side — every one of these is a gift that gives back. We believe in the power of your purchase, in sharing the best of humanity with the rest of the world, so every GOOD Market purchase supports local artisans and social causes around the world.

GOOD Market is a collaboration with NOVICA, one of the world's largest impact marketplaces for artists and artisans around the world. Here, you'll find gifts that fit the person, not just the holiday. You'll find something for every friend and family member – and great ways to celebrate a year where some days have been built around waiting for a delivery.

Here are a few suggestions for keeping this holiday season meaningful and memorable.

Gifts for those Home Not Alone aka "Family Gifts"

In a year of laughter and tears, it's time to find the perfect gift to express all they mean to you whether you're bound to them 24/7 or only sharing a screen.

GOOD Market's Artisan Gifts by global artisans range from the cool to the beautiful to the "you've got to be kidding me – posting this right now!" kind of gifts. They include jewelry and apparel, original one-of-kind artworks, archeological replicas, global decor, and countless other cultural treasures. This is the perfect place to get your loved ones gifts as special as they are.

Worry Wall Dancers (Guatemala)


Upworthy Merchandise

GOOD Market also offers a unique range of Upworthy Merch. The type of apparel that makes it easier to show everyone where you stand. This gear lets you broadcast your intention to stand up and not just stand by. Make a powerful statement with our ethically-sourced, made-in-the USA shirts and hoodies.

This Too Heather Red Unisex Sueded Jersey T-Shirt


Gifts for those Who Ain't Going Nowhere aka "The Kalamazoo to Kathmandu Blues"

Grab something from our GOOD for the Home Collection – it's perfect for bringing a touch of faraway dreaming to multi-purpose work and living spaces. From hand-tooled leather catch-alls to Peruvian ekekos and retablos there is something to quench the longing of everyone resigned to traveling sometime next year. Explore our GOOD Gift Suggestions

Handcrafted 3-Piece Shapivo Nativity Scene


Jewelry for All Seasons & Reasons

GOOD Market artisan jewelry does a whole lot of good. Our collection of traditional and contemporary designs, precious metals, and gemstones celebrate our commitment to doing and standing for what is right.

Hope and Peace Sterling Silver Stacking Ring Set


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Gifts Too Quirky for Words aka the "Different Drum" Guide

Beaded bandanas, rubber porcupine desk cups, and other never-imagineds live side by side in the GOOD Market. For those on your list that march to the beat of a different drum or just embrace the whimsical on the daily, this is your destination. You'll find everything from a rooster on a tortoise sculpture to hand-crocheted taco earrings. Let the fun begin.

Dolphin-Themed Mahogany Mini Djeme Drum from Bali


Gifts for Keeping it Cozy

The look of quarantine season is cozy and lounging at home — from scarves to sweaters or cushions to throws, our collection of handknit and handwoven GOOD Market Clothing is soft, stylish and oh-so-comfortable.


Alpaca Striped Kimono Ruana in Orange


Stocking Stuffers

Face masks have replaced the season's ubiquitous socks and you'll find hundreds of GOOD Face Masks perfect for gifting. This year tourism is down and many local markets have closed, forcing artisans around the world to make face masks to survive. Their amazing creations have allowed them to support their families, offer work to their neighbors, and keep global craft traditions alive all while helping the rest of us to mask up to stop the spread of COVID-19.

3 Colorful Nature Print 2-Layer Rayon Ear Loop Face Masks


It's time to find the good in everything - after all, that's what this season could really be about. Show someone you care for them and acknowledge the way they have cared for you. As the saying goes: it's the thought that counts. And GOOD Market is the perfect place to make thoughtful, conscious choices this holiday. Choose gifts that give back.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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via Gage Skidmore/Flickr and Terry Morgan/Flickr

Senator Ted Cruz and a kangaroo.

Conservative media in the United States has painted Australia as a state on the brink of authoritarianism due to strict COVID-19 protections in some parts of the country. These news outlets appear to be using the country as an example of what can happen in America if liberal politicians go unchecked.

Fox News' Tucker Carlson ran a story on Australia earlier this month claiming the country "looks a lot like China did at the beginning of the pandemic." He ended it by saying that "what's happening in Australia might be instructive to us in the United States" and that things can "change very quickly" and become "dystopian and autocratic."

Carlson provides zero reasons why Americans should be fearful of becoming an autocratic country due to COVID-19, beyond the idea that "things can change very quickly" so his appeals sound a lot more like fear-mongering than genuine concern.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."