More

He signed a multimillion-dollar contract but lives on $60k a year.

This isn't quite "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous."

He signed a multimillion-dollar contract but lives on $60k a year.

Hard work and athleticism paid off when Detroit Lions wide receiver Ryan Broyles signed a four-year, $3,678,500 contract with the team.

In college, Broyles played for the University of Oklahoma Sooners football team and was selected as an All-American in both the 2010 and 2011 seasons. With the exception of an injury near the end of the 2011 season, Broyles' collegiate career went about as well as he could have hoped.

As a second-round pick in the 2012 NFL Draft, Broyles knew he was in for a pretty big payday. And he was ready.


Broyles getting ready to take on the Florida Gators during the 2009 FedEx BCS National Championship. Photo by Doug Benc/Getty Images.

What Broyles did with that paycheck is somewhat unusual for your average NFL millionaire: He saved it.

I can't even begin to imagine what the temptation to go on a spending spree is like for someone who just signed a multimillion-dollar contract, but Broyles has stayed strong. He and his family have been living on a fixed income of, as he tells ESPN's Michael Rothstein, $60,000 a year, "give or take."

While Broyles is all about bringing home the bacon, he knows that once you've got it, you should probably set some of it aside.

Broyles was shown the money, but now it's in, like, a 401(k) and other long-term investments. GIF via "Jerry Maguire."

And he's right on the money, too (if you'll pardon my wordplay).

According to the NFL Players Association, the average career lasts just 3.2 years.

In 2011, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell pushed back on that number, saying that for players who make a team's opening day roster, it's closer to six years. Even so, that's not exactly a long time.

Combine that with the fact that there's a lot of concern about the long-term effects of some common injuries players deal with, and it's not a bad idea to save some money for a rainy day.

The risk of injury is real, and it's driving some players out of the league at an early age.

Take, for example, former San Francisco 49ers linebacker Chris Borland, who after signing a four-year, almost $3 million contract in 2014, retired after just a single season because he feared that the game would take too much of a toll on his health.

As a result, he earned just $574,359, forfeiting the rest.

Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images.

"That has been the biggest surprise for me. People can't get over the money," Borland told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel of his decision to retire at only 24 years old. "That's all they think about. But your health is a little more important."

Many NFL players go broke, and some file for bankruptcy.

Stat-heavy website FiveThirtyEight concluded that nearly 16% of NFL players file for bankruptcy within 12 years of leaving the sport.

Fancy cars, huge houses, and large living have a steep cost. But Broyles still sticks with driving Mazdas, and a 2005 Chevrolet Trailblazer. When he needs a rental car, he picks a Ford Focus from the lot.

Off the field, Broyles has been involved in promoting a "Financial Football" video game.

Financial literacy is an issue close to his heart. Not only does Broyles want to shore up his own financial well-being, but he wants to help others do the same, starting as young as 11.

It's a lot like that saying, "Give a man a fish, he eats for a day; teach a man to fish, he eats for a lifetime."

Broyles during a 2012 game against the Houston Texans. Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images.

What's Broyles' secret to success? Staying humble, listening to others, and focusing on what he loves to do: play football.

"I studied as much as I could," Broyles told ESPN. "Talked to people wealthier than me, smarter than me. So that definitely helps."

"When I come to work, I don't think about the money, man. I can tell you that, without a doubt. There might be some guys that do but I put myself in a position where I come out here and have fun. ... I don't have that pressure, you know what I mean. My wife has no worries. My child has no worries. For the most part, I can help my family, you know."
Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

Keep Reading Show less

On February 19, 2020, a group of outdoor adventurists took a 25-day rafting trip down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. During the trip, they had no cell service and no contact with the outside world. When they ended they ended their journey on March 14, the man who pulled them ashore asked if they had been in touch with anyone else. When the rafters said no, the man sighed, then launched into an explanation of how the globe had been gripped by the coronavirus pandemic and everything had come to a screeching halt.

The rafters listened with bewilderment as they were told about toilet paper shortages and the NBA season being canceled and everyone being asked to stay at home. One of the river guides, who had done these kinds of off-grid excursions multiple times, said that they'd often joke about coming back to a completely different world—it had just never actually happened before.

The rafters' story was shared in the New York Times last spring, but they're not the only ones to have had such an experience.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

Keep Reading Show less