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Family-owned Fresh Cravings 'Salsabrates the Good' and supports youth changemakers
Courtesy of Fresh Cravings

Fresh Cravings Salsa has donated $250,000 to 50 grassroots non-profits with a focus on youth-led initiatives.

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There's no question that we live in challenging times. But along with challenges come opportunities for change—and for changemakers to rise up.

When the world feels dark, we naturally crave the light. We look for torches of goodness, people who create and shed light on positive change in their communities and in society, as a whole. Sometimes we find these wonderful humans in the most unlikely of places—for instance, in the "Salsabrations" of a beloved snacking brand known for chilled salsas and hummus dips.

Family-owned Fresh Cravings says that its motto, "Crave Goodness," is about inspiring people to seek the best for themselves, their friends and family and their communities. It’s not just lip service; the company puts its money where its mouth is, giving back to the communities it serves. In 2021, Fresh Cravings launched a national giveback campaign to "Salsabrate™ The Good" by donating $5,000 a week—$250,000 total—to 50 grassroots, non-profit organizations with an emphasis on youth change-makers. And it's continuing its commitment to amplify and support the good in 2022.


Upworthy is thrilled to partner with Fresh Cravings in sharing these youth-led initiatives and celebrating the unsung heroes who are being lifted up in this campaign. Check out these young folks and the awesome things they're doing for their communities:

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14-year-old Khloe Thompson saw a need among the women experiencing homelessness in her community, so she started making toiletry-filled tote bags for them. Now she enlists others to help make and distribute the bags and also mentors other young people to be changemakers in their communities. In addition, she takes a trip to Ghana each year to help install water pumps in bathroom facilities. "I feel a lot of optimism for the future because I feel as if there's so many people that want to give back," says Khloe. "How ever old they are, there's a little spark inside someone. It just takes a lot to ignite it sometimes."

To learn more about Khloe Kares or to support Khloe's efforts, please visit: https://www.khloekares.com.

There are amazing initiatives all around us that we may not see that deserve to be recognized. Supporting those who are already enacting positive change in their communities—especially young people who represent the future of humanity—is one of the best ways companies and individuals can make an impact on our world.

To learn more about the other organizations Fresh Cravings is lifting up and to be part of this ongoing festival of compassion and charity, join the Salsabration and sign up for the Fresh Cravings newsletter. We can all make our world a better place by amplifying goodness and taking inspiration from the beacons of light in our communities.

Joy

1991 blooper clip of Robin Williams and Elmo is a wholesome nugget of comedic genius

Robin Williams is still bringing smiles to faces after all these years.

Robin Williams and Elmo (Kevin Clash) bloopers.

The late Robin Williams could make picking out socks funny, so pairing him with the fuzzy red monster Elmo was bound to be pure wholesome gold. Honestly, how the puppeteer, Kevin Clash, didn’t completely break character and bust out laughing is a miracle. In this short outtake clip, you get to see Williams crack a few jokes in his signature style while Elmo tries desperately to keep it together.

Williams has been a household name since what seems like the beginning of time, and before his death in 2014, he would make frequent appearances on "Sesame Street." The late actor played so many roles that if you were ask 10 different people what their favorite was, you’d likely get 10 different answers. But for the kids who spent their childhoods watching PBS, they got to see him being silly with his favorite monsters and a giant yellow canary. At least I think Big Bird is a canary.

When he stopped by "Sesame Street" for the special “Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake” in 1991, he was there to show Elmo all of the wonderful things you could do with a stick. Williams turns the stick into a hockey stick and a baton before losing his composure and walking off camera. The entire time, Elmo looks enthralled … if puppets can look enthralled. He’s definitely paying attention before slumping over at the realization that Williams goofed a line. But the actor comes back to continue the scene before Elmo slinks down inside his box after getting Williams’ name wrong, which causes his human co-star to take his stick and leave.

The little blooper reel is so cute and pure that it makes you feel good for a few minutes. For an additional boost of serotonin, check out this other (perfectly executed) clip about conflict that Williams did with the two-headed monster. He certainly had a way of engaging his audience, so it makes sense that even after all of these years, he's still greatly missed.

Noe Hernandez and Maria Carrillo, the owners of Noel Barber Shop in Anaheim, California.

Jordyn Poulter was the youngest member of the U.S. women’s volleyball team, which took home the gold medal at the Tokyo Olympics last year. She was named the best setter at the Tokyo games and has been a member of the team since 2018.

Unfortunately, according to a report from ABC 7 News, her gold medal was stolen from her car in a parking garage in Anaheim, California, on May 25.

It was taken along with her passport, which she kept in her glove compartment. While storing a gold medal in your car probably isn’t the best idea, she did it to keep it by her side while fulfilling the hectic schedule of an Olympian.

"We live this crazy life of living so many different places. So many of us play overseas, then go home, then come out here and train,” Poulter said, according to ABC 7. "So I keep the medal on me (to show) friends and family I haven't seen in a while, or just people in the community who want to see the medal. Everyone feels connected to it when they meet an Olympian, and it's such a cool thing to share with people."

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Marlon Brando on "The Dick Cavett Show" in 1973.

Marlon Brando made one of the biggest Hollywood comebacks in 1972 after playing the iconic role of Vito Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather.” The venerable actor's career had been on a decline for years after a series of flops and increasingly unruly behavior on set.

Brando was a shoo-in for Best Actor at the 1973 Academy Awards, so the actor decided to use the opportunity to make an important point about Native American representation in Hollywood.

Instead of attending the ceremony, he sent Sacheen Littlefeather, a Yaqui and Apache actress and activist, dressed in traditional clothing, to talk about the injustices faced by Native Americans.

She explained that Brando "very regretfully cannot accept this generous award, the reasons for this being … the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry and on television in movie reruns, and also with recent happenings at Wounded Knee."

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