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Man rents out theater to create incredible 'Everything, Everywhere, All At Once' proposal

Behold, “Annie-thing, Annie-where, All At Once."

everything everywhere all at once, eeao, movie theater proposals
@danyo_le/TikTok

This proposal is EVERYTHING.

Some proposals have everything. This one has “Everything, Everywhere, All At Once.”

Daniel Le recently proposed to his girlfriend, Annie, by renting out a movie theater for a screening of the 2022 hit A24 movie “Everything, Everywhere All At Once.” Unbeknownst to Annie, this version of the film would be cleverly edited to have Le playing key characters, all leading up to asking for her hand in marriage.

Le contacted multiple independent theaters before finding one that would accommodate his elaborate plan. Then, using a bit of editing wizardry—along with some help from his friends, who arrived at the theater before showtime to hide in the dark so Annie wouldn’t see them—he delivered the surprise of a lifetime.

The funniest part is watching Annie slowly start to get suspicious, even asking, “Why is the [film] quality so bad?” followed by the gleeful laugh of realization as Le shows up on screen in full Dierdre garb, bob wig and all, followed by…well…no spoilers.

Every detail about this proposal, just like the movie it’s based on, is equal parts hilarious and sweet in all the right ways.

But the real pièce de résistance comes during the live portion (seen in a follow-up video) when Le gets down on one knee and can be heard saying, "As long as I get to do laundry and taxes with you,” a nod to an iconic line in the film.

Without further ado, watch “Annie-thing, Annie-where, All At Once” below. It’s perfection.

@danyo_le Theater proposals been done before but hopefully not an EEAAO version LOL 👀 @a24 #everythingeverywhereallatonce #oscarmovie #bestactor #movieproposal #proposal #proposalvideo #movietheater #eeaao #oscars #marriageproposal #engagement #kehuyquan #jamieleecurtis #michelleyeoh ♬ In Another Life - Son Lux

She said yes—of course.

As Le pointed out, theater proposals might have been done before, sure. But folks agreed that this one had its own flavor of epic.

“THIS IS…LITERALLY…EVERYTHING.”

“It’s so nice to see men love this hard, your video and message to her had me tearing up, this is so sweet.”

“Not me crying, this is so funny, wholesome, and creative.”

“You set the bar high bro.”

"Why didn’t this get any Oscars.”

Congrats you two. May you enjoy a life full of laundry, taxes and love.

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From political science to joining the fight against cancer: How one woman found her passion

An unexpected pivot to project management expanded Krystal Brady's idea of what it means to make a positive impact.

Krystal Brady/PMI

Krystal Brady utilizes her project management skills to help advance cancer research and advocacy.

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Cancer impacts nearly everyone’s life in one way or another, and thankfully, we’re learning more about treatment and prevention every day. Individuals and organizations dedicated to fighting cancer and promising research from scientists are often front and center, but we don’t always see the people working behind the scenes to make the fight possible.

People like Krystal Brady.

While studying political science in college, Brady envisioned her future self in public office. She never dreamed she’d build a successful career in the world of oncology, helping cancer researchers, doctors and advocates continue battling cancer, but more efficiently.

Brady’s journey to oncology began with a seasonal job at a small publishing company, which helped pay for college and awakened her love for managing projects. Now, 15 years later, she’s serving as director of digital experience and strategy at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), which she describes as “the perfect place to pair my love of project management and desire to make positive change in the world.”

As a project manager, Brady helps make big ideas for the improvement of diagnosing and treating cancer a reality. She is responsible for driving the critical projects that impact the lives of cancer researchers, doctors, and patients.

“I tell people that my job is part toolbox, part glue,” says Brady. “Being a project manager means being responsible for understanding the details of a project, knowing what tools or resources you need to execute the project, and facilitating the flow of that work to the best outcome possible. That means promoting communication, partnership, and ownership among the team for the project.”

At its heart, Brady’s project management work is about helping people. One of the big projects Brady is currently working on is ASCO’s digital transformation, which includes upgrading systems and applications to help streamline and personalize oncologists’ online experience so they can access the right resources more quickly. Whether you are managing humans or machines, there’s an extraordinary need for workers with the skillset to harness new technology and solve problems.

The digital transformation project also includes preparing for the use of emerging technologies such as generative AI to help them in their research and practices.

“Most importantly, it lays the groundwork for us to make a meaningful impact at the point of care, giving the oncologist and patient the absolute latest recommendations or guidelines for care for that specific patient or case, allowing the doctor to spend more time with their patients and less time on paperwork,” Brady says.

In today’s fast-changing, quickly advancing world, project management is perhaps more valuable than ever. After discovering her love for it, Brady earned her Project Management Professional (PMP)® certification through Project Management Institute (PMI)—the premier professional organization for project managers with chapters all over the world—which she says gave her an edge over other candidates when she applied for her job at ASCO.

“The knowledge I gained in preparing for the PMP exam serves me every day in my role,” Brady says. “What I did not expect and have truly come to value is the PMI network as well – finding like-minded individuals, opportunities for continuous learning, and the ability to volunteer and give back.”

PMI’s growing community – including more than 300 chapters globally – serves as a place for project managers and individuals who use project management skills to learn and grow through events, online resources, and certification programs.

While people often think of project management in the context of corporate careers, all industries and organizations need project managers, making it a great career for those who want to elevate our world through non-profits or other service-oriented fields.

“Project management makes a difference by focusing on efficiency and outcomes, making us all a little better at what we do,” says Brady. “In almost every industry, understanding how to do our work more effectively and efficiently means more value to our customers, and the world at large, at an increased pace.”

Project management is also a stable career path in high demand as shown by PMI research, which found that the global economy will need 25 million more project managers by 2030 and that the median salary for project managers in the US has grown to $120K.

If you’d like to learn more about careers in project management, PMI has resources to help you get started or prove your proficiency, including its entry-level Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) certification program. For those interested in pursuing a project management career to make a difference, it could be your first step.
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