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lost dog; dog overboard; dog reunited

Monster finds her way home.

Imagine going fishing on your boat with your best four-legged friend but when you look for her to help you pull the net, she’s gone. That’s exactly what happened to Captain Keith “Kiwi” Soffes, a shrimp boat captain from Texas, who told his story to FOX 26 Houston. He went to look for Monster, his brown pit bull and co-captain when she didn’t come to help drag the nets and she was nowhere to be found, on or off the boat.


Being a pet parent can feel like a full-time job but that kind of companionship makes all of the mishaps and stressful moments worth it. Pets help to keep their owners entertained, though I don’t think this type of entertainment is what Monster’s dad had in mind. The shrimp boat captain said that once he realized Monster was missing he whipped the boat around to find her but had no luck. Soffes got choked up when he recalled the moment he thought he wouldn’t see his dog again.

According to Soffes, the boat was about five miles out from shore so he didn’t see how his dog—who wasn’t wearing a life vest at the time—could make it that far. He shared the story on Facebook, hoping by some miracle his sweet pooch made it to shore, but days went by without any word. This was the first time the duo had been separated for any amount of time, and Soffes was heartbroken.

Eventually, someone on social media recognized the dog and said she was at a local park. Someone else chimed in and said Monster was spotted swimming across the bay. This prompted Soffes to start going door to door looking for his best friend, who he said was afraid of the dark. Desperate to find Monster, Soffes offered a reward to anyone who could give him his dog back, and with that incentive his search finally came to a happy end.

Monster was tied to someone’s trailer and when she saw her dad, tears were shed and puppy kisses abounded. The athletic pooch now has a life vest for her next fishing trip and surely, Soffes won’t take his eyes off his co-captain. Hopefully Monster lives a long and happy life on dry land and keeps away from the edge of the boat.

Marlon Brando and Sacheen Littlefeather.

Nearly 50 years after Sacheen Littlefeather endured boos and abusive jokes at the Academy Awards, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is issuing a formal apology. In 1973, Littlefeather refused Marlon Brando's Best Actor Oscar on his behalf for his iconic role in “The Godfather” at the ceremony to protest the film industry’s treatment of Native Americans.

She explained that Brando "very regretfully cannot accept this very generous award, the reasons for this being … the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry and on television in movie reruns, and also with recent happenings at Wounded Knee."

Littlefeather is a Native American civil rights activist who was born to a Native American (Apache and Yaqui) father and a European American mother.

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via Pixabay

A father cradling his infant son.

It's almost impossible to be handed a baby and not immediately break into baby talk. In fact, it seems incredibly strange to even consider talking to a baby like one would an adult. Studies have shown that babies prefer baby talk, too.

Researchers from Stanford found that babies prefer to be spoken to in baby talk or “parentese” as scientists refer to the sing-songy cooing we do when talking to infants.

“Often parents are discouraged from using baby talk by well-meaning friends or even health professionals,” Michael Frank, a Stanford psychologist, told Stanford News. “But the evidence suggests that it’s actually a great way to engage with your baby because babies just like it–it tells them, ‘This speech is meant for you!’”

The big question that has eluded scientists is whether parentese is a universal language or varies by culture.

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Bobby McFerrin demonstrated the power of the pentatonic scale without saying a word.

Bobby McFerrin is best known for his hit song “Don’t Worry Be Happy,” which showcased his one-man vocal and body percussion skills (and got stuck in our heads for years). But his musicality extends far beyond the catchy pop tune that made him a household name. The things he can do with his voice are unmatched and his range of musical styles and genres is impressive.

The Kennedy Center describes him: “With a four-octave range and a vast array of vocal techniques, Bobby McFerrin is no mere singer; he is music's last true Renaissance man, a vocal explorer who has combined jazz, folk and a multitude of world music influences - choral, a cappella, and classical music - with his own ingredients.”

McFerrin is also a music educator, and one of his most memorable lessons is a simple, three-minute interactive demonstration in which he doesn’t say a single word.

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