Instagram / Demi Lovato

Cellulite is surprisingly common. It is believed that 85 to 98 percent of women carry around the subcutaneous fat. Genetics, lifestyle habits, and/or good old fashioned estrogen are at the root of that pesky puckered skin. It doesn't matter what dress size you wear. Cellulite happens. But even though it is very common, women spend time and money on creams and treatments trying to erase this "flaw."

Demi Lovato embraced her imperfections (if cellulite can even be called that, since it's so common), and posted an unedited photo on Instagram showing it off. In the photo, which was taken in Bora Bora, the singer is shown striking a powerful pose, wearing an animal print bikini, looking fierce with her cellulite is proudly on display.


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Lovato captioned the photo with an inspiring post that stressed the need for her to embrace who she is, as she is. "This is my biggest fear. A photo of me in a bikini unedited. And guess what, it's CELLULIT!!!! I'm just literally sooooo tired of being ashamed of my body, editing it (yes the other bikini pics were edited - and I hate that I did that but it's the truth) so that others think I'm THEIR idea of what beautiful is, but it's just not me. This is what I got. I want this new chapter in my life to be about being authentic to who I am rather than trying to meet someone else's standards. So here's me, unashamed, unafraid and proud to own a body that has fought through so much and will continue to amaze me when I hopefully give birth one day," Lovato wrote.

Her caption also included a message of empowerment for the women who have dimpled derrières. "Anyway, here's me, RAW, REAL! And I love me. And you should love you too!" she wrote.

She also acknowledged that feelings about your body can be complicated. "Just so everyone's clear.. I'm not stoked on my appearance BUT I am appreciative of it and sometimes that's the best I can do. I hope to inspire someone to appreciate their body today too," she said.

Fans and other celebrities supported the singer for facing her fears. "Literally shaking still.. that was so hard for me to post," Lovato wrote on a follow up Instagram story. "But wow.. so blown away by the love and support.. let's be the change we want to see!!!"

Inspired by Lovato, others posted photos on Instagram that celebrate their cellulite.

RELATED: Sarah Hyland has a powerful message about how people with invisible illnesses should love their bodies



Why is it so important that Lovato chose to show her thighs as they are? By doing so, she encourages others to embrace their cellulite, making it less likely to be perceived as a flaw, and more likely to be perceived as a common occurrence.

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It is said that once you've seen something, you can't unsee it. This is exactly what is happening in America right now. We have collectively watched the pot of racial tension boil over after years of looking the other way, insisting that hot water doesn't exist, pretending not to notice the smoke billowing out from every direction.

Ignoring a problem doesn't make it go away—it prolongs resolution. There's a whole lot of harm to be remedied and damage to be repaired as a result of racial injustice, and it's up to all of us to figure out how to do that. Parents, in particular, are recognizing the importance of raising anti-racist children; if we are unable to completely eradicate racism, maybe the next generation will.

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As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

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Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

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I saw this poster today and I was going to just let it go, but then I kept feeling tugged to say something.

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Two years ago, I got off the phone after an interview and cried my eyes out. I'd just spent an hour talking to Tim Ballard, the founder of Operation Underground Railroad, an organization that helps fight child sex trafficking, and I just couldn't take it.

Ballard told me about how the training to go undercover as a child predator nearly broke him. He told me an eerie story of a trafficker who could totally compartmentalize, showing Ballard photos of kids he had for sale, then switching gears to proudly show him a photo of his own daughter on her bicycle, just as any parent would. He told me about how lucrative child trafficking is—how a child can bring in three or four times as much as a female prostitute—and how Americans are the industry's biggest consumers.

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